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Title: Atmospheric pollutant emission factors from open burning of agricultural and forest biomass by wind tunnel simulations. Volume 3. Results, wood fuels. Final report

Abstract

Atmospheric pollutant emission factors were determined by wind tunnel simulations of spreading and pile fires for 8 different types of fuel including barley, rice and wheat straw, corn stover, almond and walnut tree prunings, and Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine slash. Emission factors were determined for each fuel for CO, NO, NOx, SO2, total hydrocarbons, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, total sulfur, CO2, particulate matter, volatile organic matter (VOC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determined from light transmission measurements through filter samples. Emission rate were correlated against burning conditions and fuel compositions. Factors affecting the buring rates and emission factors included inlet air temperature, loading rate, and wind speed. Volume 3 contains data from wood fuels.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering
OSTI Identifier:
445731
Report Number(s):
PB-97-132369/XAB
CNN: Contract ARB-A932-126; TRN: 70491373
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: See also Volume 2, PB--97-126940; PBD: Apr 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WOOD WASTES; COMBUSTION; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; BIOMASS

Citation Formats

Jenkins, B.M., Turn, S.Q., Williams, R.B., Goronea, M., and Abd-el-Fattah, H. Atmospheric pollutant emission factors from open burning of agricultural and forest biomass by wind tunnel simulations. Volume 3. Results, wood fuels. Final report. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Jenkins, B.M., Turn, S.Q., Williams, R.B., Goronea, M., & Abd-el-Fattah, H. Atmospheric pollutant emission factors from open burning of agricultural and forest biomass by wind tunnel simulations. Volume 3. Results, wood fuels. Final report. United States.
Jenkins, B.M., Turn, S.Q., Williams, R.B., Goronea, M., and Abd-el-Fattah, H. 1996. "Atmospheric pollutant emission factors from open burning of agricultural and forest biomass by wind tunnel simulations. Volume 3. Results, wood fuels. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_445731,
title = {Atmospheric pollutant emission factors from open burning of agricultural and forest biomass by wind tunnel simulations. Volume 3. Results, wood fuels. Final report},
author = {Jenkins, B.M. and Turn, S.Q. and Williams, R.B. and Goronea, M. and Abd-el-Fattah, H.},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric pollutant emission factors were determined by wind tunnel simulations of spreading and pile fires for 8 different types of fuel including barley, rice and wheat straw, corn stover, almond and walnut tree prunings, and Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine slash. Emission factors were determined for each fuel for CO, NO, NOx, SO2, total hydrocarbons, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, total sulfur, CO2, particulate matter, volatile organic matter (VOC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determined from light transmission measurements through filter samples. Emission rate were correlated against burning conditions and fuel compositions. Factors affecting the buring rates and emission factors included inlet air temperature, loading rate, and wind speed. Volume 3 contains data from wood fuels.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:
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  • Atmospheric pollutant emission factors were determined by wind tunnel simulations of spreading and pile fires for 8 different types of fuel including barley, rice and wheat straw, corn stove, almond and walnut tree prunings, and Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine slash. Emission factors were determined for each fuel for CO, NO, NOx, SO2, total hydrocarbons, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, total sulfur, CO2, particulate matter, volatile organic matter (VOC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Elemental compositions of particulate matter were determined by size category. Bulk aerosol absorption coefficients were determined from light transmission measurements through filter samples. Emission rates were correlated againstmore » burning conditions and fuel compositions. Factors affecting the burning rates and emission factors included inlet air temperature, loading rate, and wind speed. Vol. 2 contains data from cereal straws and stovers.« less
  • Atmospheric pollutant emission factors were determined by wind tunnel simulations of spreading and pile fires for 8 different types of fuel including barley, rice and wheat straw, corn stover, almond and walnut tree prunings, and Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine slash. Cereal straws and stover were burned in fires spreading against an impressed wind, pile burns in wood fuels were naturally ventilaled through the side doors. Emission factors were determined for each fuel for CO, NO, NOx, SO2, total hydrocarbons, methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, total sulfur, CO2, particulate matter, volatile organic matter (VOC), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Elemental compositions ofmore » particulate matter were determined by size category. Bulk aerosol absorption coefficients were determined from light transmission measurements through filter samples. Emission rates were correlated against burning conditions and fuel compositions. Factor affecting the burning rates and emission factors included inlet air temperature, loading rate, and wind speed.« less
  • The report describes the quality assurance/quality control program conducted during 1990 field testing which supported the OB/OD Thermal Treatment Methods Study. The QA/QC program encompassed sample collection, preparation, storage, extraction, analytical instrument operation, data reduction, statistical data analyses and interpretation. Samples included atmosphere collected in evacuated stainless steel canisters, soil, and Teflon coated-glass-fiber media. The supercritical fluid chromatograph and gas chromatograph with mass spectrometers were the principal laboratory analytical instruments used during these field tests. Real-time instruments detected and quantified CO, C02, NO, NO2, and NOx. Near-real-time analyses were accomplished by use of a Teflon bag in which samples ofmore » the plume were collected for analyses during testing operations. Sample-tracking was conducted using a system which permitted precise identification of individual specimens from collection through analyses or archiving. Analysis of atmosphere and soil samples spiked by the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) reflected a degree of accuracy well within acceptable limits. Open burning; open detonation; OB/OD; TNT; double base propellant; manufacturers residue propellant; air emissions; thermal treatment; carbon balance; and emission factor.« less
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  • The report covers the OB/OD field tests A, B, and C using the methodology and technology developed in the BangBox (BB) test for use on the fixed-wing aircraft (FWAC). Field test A was a checkout of the equipment and sampling selected from the BB test, and the development of procedures for sampling the TNT detonation crater soil, and the particle fallout In the surrounding area. Triple-base propellant was also burned in pans with the area sampled to 30-m with fallout pans. The analytes in both the air emission and the soil were identify and quantified. Field test B used TNTmore » as the explosive and manufacturing residue as the burn material. Air sampling with the FWAC and soil sampling provided estimates of emission factors (EF) and soil contaminates that were detected above background levels. Suspended TNT detonations and manufacturing residue bums were also characterized for emission products. Phase C test using refinements in sampling and analysis from the previous phases provided data for TNT, composition B, explosive D, and RDX detonations and manufacturing residue single-base (M1,M6) propellant bums. The EF data from the TNT field tests were examined and compared with BB data; the results were comparable in the analytes detected and the level of analytes detected. The results indicate an efficiency for the detonation >92 percent (Continued on reverse) Opening burning; open detonation;OB/OD; TNT; Double base propellant; manufacturers residue propellant; air emissions; thermal treatment; carbon balance; and emission factor.« less