skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved

Abstract

Human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) belongs to the MEF2 subfamily of the MADS (MCM1, AGAMOUS, DEF A, serum response factor) family of transcription factors. Members of the MADS family share a conserved domain - the MADS domain - that is necessary for DNA binding. Highly conserved versions of the MADS domain and of an adjacent domain that is known as the MEF2 domain are found in members of the MEF2 subfamily. Both of these domains are necessary for binding to the MEF2 regulatory element. This regulatory element is known to be functionally important in a variety of muscle-specific genes and possibly in the brain creatine kinase gene. The MEF2C gene product activates transcription by binding to the MEF2 element. hMEF2C is expressed at high levels in postmitotic neurons in the brain, where it is most abundant in the cerebral cortex, and is also expressed in differentiated myotubes. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of a rat homologue of MEF2C, and a mouse homologue has been cloned. The mouse gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 13 in a region that is syntenic to human 5q13-q15. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
443890
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: 10 Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS; GENETIC MAPPING; BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION; GENE REGULATION; GENE MUTATIONS; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 5; CHROMOSOMES; CREATINE; PHOSPHOTRANSFERASES; MICE; DNA HYBRIDIZATION; FLUORESCENCE; BUDR; BANDING TECHNIQUES; HEREDITARY DISEASES; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

Citation Formats

Krainc, D., Lipton, S.A., Haas, M., and Ward, D.C. Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9927.
Krainc, D., Lipton, S.A., Haas, M., & Ward, D.C. Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved. United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9927.
Krainc, D., Lipton, S.A., Haas, M., and Ward, D.C. Tue . "Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved". United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1995.9927.
@article{osti_443890,
title = {Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved},
author = {Krainc, D. and Lipton, S.A. and Haas, M. and Ward, D.C.},
abstractNote = {Human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) belongs to the MEF2 subfamily of the MADS (MCM1, AGAMOUS, DEF A, serum response factor) family of transcription factors. Members of the MADS family share a conserved domain - the MADS domain - that is necessary for DNA binding. Highly conserved versions of the MADS domain and of an adjacent domain that is known as the MEF2 domain are found in members of the MEF2 subfamily. Both of these domains are necessary for binding to the MEF2 regulatory element. This regulatory element is known to be functionally important in a variety of muscle-specific genes and possibly in the brain creatine kinase gene. The MEF2C gene product activates transcription by binding to the MEF2 element. hMEF2C is expressed at high levels in postmitotic neurons in the brain, where it is most abundant in the cerebral cortex, and is also expressed in differentiated myotubes. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of a rat homologue of MEF2C, and a mouse homologue has been cloned. The mouse gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 13 in a region that is syntenic to human 5q13-q15. 12 refs., 1 fig.},
doi = {10.1006/geno.1995.9927},
journal = {Genomics},
number = 3,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Tue Oct 10 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}