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Title: Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

Abstract

A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
442577
Report Number(s):
CONF-950828-
ISBN 0-7918-1707-5; TRN: IM9712%%2
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1995 National heat transfer conference, Portland, OR (United States), 5-9 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of 1995 national heat transfer conference: Proceedings. Volume 6: Basic aspects of two phase flow and heat transfer; HTD-Volume 308; Dhir, V.K. [ed.] [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]; PB: 152 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; HEAT TRANSFER; NUCLEATE BOILING; FLOW VISUALIZATION; HEAT FLUX; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; SURFACTANTS

Citation Formats

Ammerman, C.N., You, S.M., and Hong, Y.S. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Ammerman, C.N., You, S.M., & Hong, Y.S. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72. United States.
Ammerman, C.N., You, S.M., and Hong, Y.S. 1995. "Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_442577,
title = {Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72},
author = {Ammerman, C.N. and You, S.M. and Hong, Y.S.},
abstractNote = {A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Book:
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