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Title: VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

Abstract

This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Originating Research Org. not identified
OSTI Identifier:
4343403
Patent Number(s):
US 2826624
Assignee:
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission DTIE; NSA-12-010256
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-58
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
PATENTS; COILS; CONDENSERS; COOLANTS; COOLING; CORROSION; CRUCIBLES; FURNACES; INDUCTION; JACKETS; METALS; PATENT; SURFACES; VAPORS; WATER

Citation Formats

Reese, S.L., and Samoriga, S.A. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE. United States: N. p., 1958. Web.
Reese, S.L., & Samoriga, S.A. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE. United States.
Reese, S.L., and Samoriga, S.A. 1958. "VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4343403,
title = {VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE},
author = {Reese, S.L. and Samoriga, S.A.},
abstractNote = {This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1958,
month = 3
}
  • A heat treating furnace is described comprising wall means defining a work chamber, electric resistance heating elements disposed inside of the chamber for heating workpieces therein, and means for attaching the heating elements to the wall means. The furnace is characterized in that each of the attaching means comprises a threaded nut having an outer end bonded rigidly to the inner side of the wall means, the wall means being imperforate in that area of the wall means directly opposing the entirety of the outer side of the nut, and elongated hanger rod having an outer end portion threaded intomore » the nut and terminating short of the outer side of the wall means, and means for connecting a heating element to and insulating the heating element electrically from the inner end portion of the hanger rod. The wall means consists of an innermost radiation shield spaced outwardly from the heating element, the connecting and insulating means comprising a ceramic tube having an outer end abutting the shield and having an inner end portion extending through a hole in the heating element. The inner end portion of the hanger rod also extends through the hole, the ceramic tube being telescoped over the hanger rod and insulating the inner end portion of the hanger rod from the heating element, a ceramic washer telescoped over the inner end portion of the ceramic tub and abutting the inner side of the heating element adjacent the hole, a retaining washer telescoped over the inner end portion of the hanger rod and covering the inner side of the ceramic washer. The retaining washer is insulated from the heating element by the ceramic washer, and means for captivating the retaining washer on the inner end portion of the hanger rod.« less
  • Apparatus and method for substantially blocking the ''line-of-sight'' between a radiant section of a funace and a convection section positioned above the radiant section, while at the same time permitting flue gases from the radiant section to travel substantially freely through the shield. The shield may be composed of a plurality of staggered bodies. In a preferred embodiment the bodies are staggered plates, composed of insulating material. The staggered plates are supported by hangers that are hung from convection tubes in the convection section. In another embodiment the staggered bodies are tubes or rods.