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Title: WORLD-WIDE FALLOUT FROM OPERATION CASTLE

Abstract

A world-wide network of gummed film stations was established to monitor fall-out following Operation Castle. Although meteorological data were poor, a general connection of tropospheric flow patterns with observed fall-out was evident. There was a tendency for debris to remain in tropical latitudes, with incursions into the temperate regions associated with meteorological disturbances of the predominantly zonal flow. As the season advanced, such incursions became more evident. Outside of the tropics, the southwestern United States received the greatest total fall-out, about five times that received in Japan. The maximum fall-out on any day at an individual station in the United States, correeted to sampling day, was 200,000 d/m/ft/sup 2/. It is concluded that the probability of early fall-out in inhabited regions would be reduced by holding Pacific test series in the winter months. (auth)

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Weather Bureau, Washington, D.C.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
4279860
Report Number(s):
NYO-4645(Del.2)
NSA Number:
NSA-13-011065
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Decl. with deletions Apr. 28, 1959. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
HEALTH AND SAFETY; DISTURBANCES; FALLOUT; FILMS; METEOROLOGY; MONITORING; PROJECT CASTLE; RADIOACTIVITY; SAMPLING; TEMPERATURE; VARIATIONS

Citation Formats

List, R.J. WORLD-WIDE FALLOUT FROM OPERATION CASTLE. United States: N. p., 1955. Web. doi:10.2172/4279860.
List, R.J. WORLD-WIDE FALLOUT FROM OPERATION CASTLE. United States. doi:10.2172/4279860.
List, R.J. Tue . "WORLD-WIDE FALLOUT FROM OPERATION CASTLE". United States. doi:10.2172/4279860. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4279860.
@article{osti_4279860,
title = {WORLD-WIDE FALLOUT FROM OPERATION CASTLE},
author = {List, R.J.},
abstractNote = {A world-wide network of gummed film stations was established to monitor fall-out following Operation Castle. Although meteorological data were poor, a general connection of tropospheric flow patterns with observed fall-out was evident. There was a tendency for debris to remain in tropical latitudes, with incursions into the temperate regions associated with meteorological disturbances of the predominantly zonal flow. As the season advanced, such incursions became more evident. Outside of the tropics, the southwestern United States received the greatest total fall-out, about five times that received in Japan. The maximum fall-out on any day at an individual station in the United States, correeted to sampling day, was 200,000 d/m/ft/sup 2/. It is concluded that the probability of early fall-out in inhabited regions would be reduced by holding Pacific test series in the winter months. (auth)},
doi = {10.2172/4279860},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1955},
month = {5}
}