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Title: Air quality impacts of electric vehicles

Abstract

The potential air quality impacts of electric vehicles in North Carolina are evaluated considering both air pollution reductions from less use of internal combustion engine vehicles and also additional air pollution at electric power plants. Using a consumer survey of 260 households, estimates of EV sales at $20,000 per vehicle, $15,000 and $10,000 are first made. EV purchases are classified as to whether they would be additional (new to family) or replacements of conventional cars. For additional vehicles, the extra pollution is computed as mileage driven, times KWH/mile, times power plant pollution rates. This pollution is then attributed directly to power plants, using NC pollution rates and the NC fuel mix. For replacement vehicles, EV pollution added to power plants is offset by direct pollution savings from ICE vahicles. Pollution effects are computed for each observation and displayed on a GIS of the state. Results show that EV air pollution effects are highly dependent on the assumptions made about the fraction of additional vs. replacement vehicles, and future power plant emission rates. The study concludes that EV effects on air pollution are highly uncertain.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
418695
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Report number 113; PBD: 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; NORTH CAROLINA; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; AIR POLLUTION; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS

Citation Formats

Hartgen, D.T., Murthy, M., Cheung, N.N.Y., and Patten, J.A. Air quality impacts of electric vehicles. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Hartgen, D.T., Murthy, M., Cheung, N.N.Y., & Patten, J.A. Air quality impacts of electric vehicles. United States.
Hartgen, D.T., Murthy, M., Cheung, N.N.Y., and Patten, J.A. Sat . "Air quality impacts of electric vehicles". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_418695,
title = {Air quality impacts of electric vehicles},
author = {Hartgen, D.T. and Murthy, M. and Cheung, N.N.Y. and Patten, J.A.},
abstractNote = {The potential air quality impacts of electric vehicles in North Carolina are evaluated considering both air pollution reductions from less use of internal combustion engine vehicles and also additional air pollution at electric power plants. Using a consumer survey of 260 households, estimates of EV sales at $20,000 per vehicle, $15,000 and $10,000 are first made. EV purchases are classified as to whether they would be additional (new to family) or replacements of conventional cars. For additional vehicles, the extra pollution is computed as mileage driven, times KWH/mile, times power plant pollution rates. This pollution is then attributed directly to power plants, using NC pollution rates and the NC fuel mix. For replacement vehicles, EV pollution added to power plants is offset by direct pollution savings from ICE vahicles. Pollution effects are computed for each observation and displayed on a GIS of the state. Results show that EV air pollution effects are highly dependent on the assumptions made about the fraction of additional vs. replacement vehicles, and future power plant emission rates. The study concludes that EV effects on air pollution are highly uncertain.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Miscellaneous:
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  • Future emissions of air pollutants and resulting air quality in the 24 largest Air Quality Control Regions in the United States are projected for the five primary air pollutants: total suspended particulates (TSP), sulfur oxides (SOX), nitrogen oxides (NOX), total hydrocarbons (THC), and carbon monoxide (CO). Separate projections are made for the years 1990 and 2000 and for three electric and hybrid vehicle (EHV) penetration scenarios: Low II, Medium, and High II. The scenarios, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, define three mixes of electric and hybrid autos and light-duty trucks, ranging from a low of 290,000 EHVs in 1990 tomore » a fleet of over 23 million EHVs in 2000. It is estimated that 23 million EHVs in 2000 would result in a 5-percent savings in national oil consumption. Projections of emissions in the 24 Air Quality Control Regions (AQCRs) having the largest populations in 1975 are made using two sources of emissions inventories: the Regional Emission Projection System (REPS) and the Strategic Environmental Assessment System (SEAS). Both systems project a decrease in future TSP, THC, and CO emissions but there is some uncertainty about future SOX and NOX emissions. SEAS projects SOX levels will remain the same and NOX will increase by 5 percent. REPS projects that with stringent controls SOX could drop by 30 percent and NOX could drop by 13 percent. Relative to these baseline projections, it is estimated that EHVs will cause an increase in SOX emissions in the AQCRs while decreasing NOX, THC, and CO emissions.« less
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