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Title: In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN

Abstract

Tennessee`s first horizontal groundwater remediation well was installed at Madisonville located in the eastern Valley and Ridge Province. The open-ended well, drilled through clay soil, is constructed of 280 feet HDPE pipe, 2 inches in diameter, with a screen length of 100 feet at 18 feet below ground surface. The purpose of the well is to remediate gasoline contaminated groundwater that resulted from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) system. The groundwater benzene and TPH plumes covered an area of one-half acre and extended beneath a rural grocery store. Remediation is achieved by injecting aerated water, nutrients and microbes to reduce contaminant levels to drinking water standards. MODFLOW was utilized to computer-model the development of the groundwater mound that would result from injection. It was calculated that one horizontal injection well would equal the efficiency of 80 vertical injection wells. Benzene and TPH masses have been reduced by 92% and 95% respectively. BIOTRANS calculated the bio-decay rate to determine remediation time. This system will reduce project life and eliminate additional costs associated with: operations and maintenance (versus vertical pump and treat), water disposal, emissions controls, well installations, and site disturbance. A {open_quotes}Minimum Economic Plume Size{close_quotes}, the minimum plume volume requiredmore » to support a horizontal system has been developed. Although costs per foot are greater for horizontal drilling than vertical drilling, project costs savings are realized later in the project.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Marion Environmental, Inc., Chattanooga, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
411944
Report Number(s):
CONF-9610180-
Journal ID: AABUD2; ISSN 0149-1423; TRN: 96:005901-0076
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AAPG Bulletin; Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 9; Conference: American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) gulf coast association of geological societies meeting, San Antonio, TX (United States), 2-4 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; TENNESSEE; REMEDIAL ACTION; DIRECTIONAL DRILLING; GROUND WATER; CONTAMINATION; HYDROCARBONS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; M CODES; B CODES

Citation Formats

Miller, M.B., Clark, D.A., Handler, M., and Zhing-Ming Huang. In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Miller, M.B., Clark, D.A., Handler, M., & Zhing-Ming Huang. In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN. United States.
Miller, M.B., Clark, D.A., Handler, M., and Zhing-Ming Huang. Sun . "In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_411944,
title = {In-situ bioremediation of groundwater using a horizontal injection well in clay soil, Madisonville, TN},
author = {Miller, M.B. and Clark, D.A. and Handler, M. and Zhing-Ming Huang},
abstractNote = {Tennessee`s first horizontal groundwater remediation well was installed at Madisonville located in the eastern Valley and Ridge Province. The open-ended well, drilled through clay soil, is constructed of 280 feet HDPE pipe, 2 inches in diameter, with a screen length of 100 feet at 18 feet below ground surface. The purpose of the well is to remediate gasoline contaminated groundwater that resulted from a leaking underground storage tank (UST) system. The groundwater benzene and TPH plumes covered an area of one-half acre and extended beneath a rural grocery store. Remediation is achieved by injecting aerated water, nutrients and microbes to reduce contaminant levels to drinking water standards. MODFLOW was utilized to computer-model the development of the groundwater mound that would result from injection. It was calculated that one horizontal injection well would equal the efficiency of 80 vertical injection wells. Benzene and TPH masses have been reduced by 92% and 95% respectively. BIOTRANS calculated the bio-decay rate to determine remediation time. This system will reduce project life and eliminate additional costs associated with: operations and maintenance (versus vertical pump and treat), water disposal, emissions controls, well installations, and site disturbance. A {open_quotes}Minimum Economic Plume Size{close_quotes}, the minimum plume volume required to support a horizontal system has been developed. Although costs per foot are greater for horizontal drilling than vertical drilling, project costs savings are realized later in the project.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG Bulletin},
number = 9,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}
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