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Title: Saxton soil remediation project

Abstract

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
411541
Report Number(s):
CONF-951006-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 97:000794
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; Journal Volume: 73; Conference: Winter meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), San Francisco, CA (United States), 29 Oct - 1 Nov 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; REMEDIAL ACTION; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; SAXTON REACTOR; REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; CESIUM 137; COBALT 60; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; PUBLIC RELATIONS

Citation Formats

Holmes, R.D. Saxton soil remediation project. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Holmes, R.D. Saxton soil remediation project. United States.
Holmes, R.D. 1995. "Saxton soil remediation project". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_411541,
title = {Saxton soil remediation project},
author = {Holmes, R.D.},
abstractNote = {The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}
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