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Title: Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

Abstract

Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka (Japan)
  2. Univ. of Occupational & Environmental Health, Kitakyusyu (Japan)
  3. Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
411528
Report Number(s):
CONF-951006-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 97:000781
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; Journal Volume: 73; Conference: Winter meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), San Francisco, CA (United States), 29 Oct - 1 Nov 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; FETUSES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; FRUIT FLIES; MALE GENITALS; RATS; CAFFEINE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CARCINOGENS; EMBRYOS; GENES; CELL KILLING; EXCISION REPAIR; MUTAGENESIS; NATURAL KILLER CELLS

Citation Formats

Kondo, Sohei, Norimura, Toshiyuki, and Nomura, Taisei. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Kondo, Sohei, Norimura, Toshiyuki, & Nomura, Taisei. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation. United States.
Kondo, Sohei, Norimura, Toshiyuki, and Nomura, Taisei. 1995. "Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_411528,
title = {Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation},
author = {Kondo, Sohei and Norimura, Toshiyuki and Nomura, Taisei},
abstractNote = {Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}
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