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Title: High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

Abstract

A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Originating Research Org. not identified
OSTI Identifier:
4020717
Patent Number(s):
PAT-APPL-509,990.; US 3922903
Assignee:
to U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration TIC; NSA-33-025899
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 1974 Sep 27; Other Information: G01N3/18. Orig. Receipt Date: 30-JUN-76
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
N42400* -Engineering-Materials Testing; 420500* -Engineering-Materials Testing; *MATERIALS TESTING- TEST FACILITIES; *REACTOR MATERIALS- STRESS CORROSION; *STRESS CORROSION- TEST FACILITIES; DESIGN; HIGH PRESSURE; HIGH TEMPERATURE; TENSILE PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Bornstein, A.N., and Indig, M.E. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device. United States: N. p., 1975. Web.
Bornstein, A.N., & Indig, M.E. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device. United States.
Bornstein, A.N., and Indig, M.E. 1975. "High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4020717,
title = {High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device},
author = {Bornstein, A.N. and Indig, M.E.},
abstractNote = {A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1975,
month =
}
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