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Title: Dose-related cell proliferation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) after N-nitrosodiethylamine exposure

Abstract

Cell proliferation is important in toxic and carcinogenic mechanisms. Carcinogens such as N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) that cause necrotizing injury stimulate cell proliferation as part of an injury-repair mechanism. A stimulus to cell division in an organ with a low rate of cell division, such as the liver, may initiate or enhance the carcinogenicity of a chemical. The authors examined the effect of DEN exposure on cell proliferation in the liver of medaka (Oryzias latipes). Two age groups (6 and 56 days post-hatch) were exposed to DEN continuously at 5 doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 ppm) for 28 days. Cell proliferation was measured using the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) assay two months post-initiation of DEN exposure. The assay involves monoclonal antibody detection of PCNA, an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta which is, expressed during cell division. Results suggested that cell proliferation paralleled the DEN dose and that age at initiation of exposure did not affect this relationship. The increase in cell proliferation appeared to be a sustained response from that initiated during DEN exposure. The study suggests that cell proliferation in medaka is an important component in carcinogenesis and is related to carcinogen exposure dose.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)|[Gulf Coast Research Lab., Ocean Springs, MS (United States)
  2. Gulf Coast Research Lab., Ocean Springs, MS (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
40089
Report Number(s):
CONF-9410273-
TRN: IM9520%%284
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15. annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Denver, CO (United States), 30 Oct - 3 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 15th annual meeting: Abstract book. Ecological risk: Science, policy, law, and perception; PB: 286 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; NITROSO COMPOUNDS; CARCINOGENESIS; FISHES; SENSITIVITY; LIVER; CELL PROLIFERATION; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

Citation Formats

Ortego, L.S., Hawkins, W.E., and Walker, W.W.. Dose-related cell proliferation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) after N-nitrosodiethylamine exposure. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Ortego, L.S., Hawkins, W.E., & Walker, W.W.. Dose-related cell proliferation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) after N-nitrosodiethylamine exposure. United States.
Ortego, L.S., Hawkins, W.E., and Walker, W.W.. Sat . "Dose-related cell proliferation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) after N-nitrosodiethylamine exposure". United States.
@article{osti_40089,
title = {Dose-related cell proliferation in medaka (Oryzias latipes) after N-nitrosodiethylamine exposure},
author = {Ortego, L.S. and Hawkins, W.E. and Walker, W.W.},
abstractNote = {Cell proliferation is important in toxic and carcinogenic mechanisms. Carcinogens such as N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) that cause necrotizing injury stimulate cell proliferation as part of an injury-repair mechanism. A stimulus to cell division in an organ with a low rate of cell division, such as the liver, may initiate or enhance the carcinogenicity of a chemical. The authors examined the effect of DEN exposure on cell proliferation in the liver of medaka (Oryzias latipes). Two age groups (6 and 56 days post-hatch) were exposed to DEN continuously at 5 doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 ppm) for 28 days. Cell proliferation was measured using the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) assay two months post-initiation of DEN exposure. The assay involves monoclonal antibody detection of PCNA, an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta which is, expressed during cell division. Results suggested that cell proliferation paralleled the DEN dose and that age at initiation of exposure did not affect this relationship. The increase in cell proliferation appeared to be a sustained response from that initiated during DEN exposure. The study suggests that cell proliferation in medaka is an important component in carcinogenesis and is related to carcinogen exposure dose.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Sat Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Conference:
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