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Title: Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water

Abstract

Respiration tests were performed to measure the effect of subsurface aeration on the biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in vadose zone soils (bioventing) and ground water (biosparging). The aerobic biodegradation of petroleum contamination is typically limited by the absence of oxygen in the soil and ground water. Therefore, the goal of these bioremediation technologies is to increase the oxygen concentration in the subsurface and thereby enhance the natural aerobic biodegradation of the organic contamination. One case study for biosparging bioremediation testing is presented. At this site atmospheric air was injected into the ground water to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration in the ground water surrounding a well, and to aerate the smear zone above the ground water table. Aeration flow rates of 3 to 8 cfm (0.09 to 0.23 m{sup 3}/min) were sufficient to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration. Petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation rates of 32 to 47 {micro}g/l/hour were calculated based on measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration in ground water. The results of this test have demonstrated that biosparging enhances the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, but the results as they apply to remediation are not known. Two case studies for bioventing respiration testing are presented.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Komex-H2O Science, Huntington Beach, CA (United States)
  2. Komex-H2O Science, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)
  3. Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
398129
Report Number(s):
CONF-960393-
TRN: 96:029982
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6. annual West Coast conference on contaminated soils and groundwater, Newport Beach, CA (United States), 11-14 Mar 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of The sixth West Coast conference on contaminated soils and groundwater: Analysis, fate, environmental and public health effects, and remediation. Part 3; PB: 366 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; GROUND WATER; REMEDIAL ACTION; SOILS; HYDROCARBONS; BIODEGRADATION; OIL SPILLS; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Gray, A L, Brown, A, Moore, B J, and Payne, R E. Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Gray, A L, Brown, A, Moore, B J, & Payne, R E. Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water. United States.
Gray, A L, Brown, A, Moore, B J, and Payne, R E. Sun . "Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water". United States.
@article{osti_398129,
title = {Respiration testing for bioventing and biosparging remediation of petroleum contaminated soil and ground water},
author = {Gray, A L and Brown, A and Moore, B J and Payne, R E},
abstractNote = {Respiration tests were performed to measure the effect of subsurface aeration on the biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in vadose zone soils (bioventing) and ground water (biosparging). The aerobic biodegradation of petroleum contamination is typically limited by the absence of oxygen in the soil and ground water. Therefore, the goal of these bioremediation technologies is to increase the oxygen concentration in the subsurface and thereby enhance the natural aerobic biodegradation of the organic contamination. One case study for biosparging bioremediation testing is presented. At this site atmospheric air was injected into the ground water to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration in the ground water surrounding a well, and to aerate the smear zone above the ground water table. Aeration flow rates of 3 to 8 cfm (0.09 to 0.23 m{sup 3}/min) were sufficient to increase the dissolved oxygen concentration. Petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation rates of 32 to 47 {micro}g/l/hour were calculated based on measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration in ground water. The results of this test have demonstrated that biosparging enhances the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, but the results as they apply to remediation are not known. Two case studies for bioventing respiration testing are presented.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/398129}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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