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Title: Defect-related versus excitonic visible light emission from ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}

Abstract

Two sources of room temperature visible luminescence are identified from SiO{sub 2} films containing ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals. From a comparison of luminescence spectra and photoluminescence decay lifetime measurements between Xe{sup +}-implanted SiO{sub 2} films and SiO{sub 2} films containing Si nanocrystals, a luminescence feature attributable to defects in the SiO{sub 2} matrix is unambiguously identified. Hydrogen passivation of the films selectively quenches the matrix defect luminescence, after which luminescence attributable to Si nanocrystals is evident, with a lifetime on the order of milliseconds. The peak energy of the remaining luminescence attributable to Si nanocrystals {open_quote}{open_quote}redshifts{close_quote}{close_quote} as a function of different processing parameters that might lead to increased nanocrystal size and the intensity is directly correlated to the formation of Si nanocrystals. Upon further annealing hydrogen-passivated samples at low temperatures ({lt}500{degree}C), the intensity of nanocrystal luminescence increases by more than a factor of 10. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)
  2. FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (the Netherlands)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
383730
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-89ER45395
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 69; Journal Issue: 14; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SILICON; EMISSION SPECTRA; SILICON OXIDES; VISIBLE RADIATION; ION BEAMS; EXCITONS; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; DEFECTS; HYDROGEN ADDITIONS; RED SHIFT; SYNTHESIS

Citation Formats

Min, K S, Shcheglov, K V, Yang, C M, Atwater, H A, Brongersma, M L, and Polman, A. Defect-related versus excitonic visible light emission from ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1063/1.116870.
Min, K S, Shcheglov, K V, Yang, C M, Atwater, H A, Brongersma, M L, & Polman, A. Defect-related versus excitonic visible light emission from ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}. United States. doi:10.1063/1.116870.
Min, K S, Shcheglov, K V, Yang, C M, Atwater, H A, Brongersma, M L, and Polman, A. Sun . "Defect-related versus excitonic visible light emission from ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}". United States. doi:10.1063/1.116870.
@article{osti_383730,
title = {Defect-related versus excitonic visible light emission from ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}},
author = {Min, K S and Shcheglov, K V and Yang, C M and Atwater, H A and Brongersma, M L and Polman, A},
abstractNote = {Two sources of room temperature visible luminescence are identified from SiO{sub 2} films containing ion beam synthesized Si nanocrystals. From a comparison of luminescence spectra and photoluminescence decay lifetime measurements between Xe{sup +}-implanted SiO{sub 2} films and SiO{sub 2} films containing Si nanocrystals, a luminescence feature attributable to defects in the SiO{sub 2} matrix is unambiguously identified. Hydrogen passivation of the films selectively quenches the matrix defect luminescence, after which luminescence attributable to Si nanocrystals is evident, with a lifetime on the order of milliseconds. The peak energy of the remaining luminescence attributable to Si nanocrystals {open_quote}{open_quote}redshifts{close_quote}{close_quote} as a function of different processing parameters that might lead to increased nanocrystal size and the intensity is directly correlated to the formation of Si nanocrystals. Upon further annealing hydrogen-passivated samples at low temperatures ({lt}500{degree}C), the intensity of nanocrystal luminescence increases by more than a factor of 10. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}},
doi = {10.1063/1.116870},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 14,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {9}
}