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Title: Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin

Abstract

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that {>=}10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A aremore » larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. 41 refs., 2 figs.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
381273
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Journal of Human Genetics; Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; HEREDITARY DISEASES; GENETICS; GENES; PATIENTS; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 17; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; MEIOSIS; CROSSING-OVER; GENETIC MAPPING; GENE RECOMBINATION; DOMINANT MUTATIONS; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; OOGENESIS

Citation Formats

Blair, I.P., Nash, J., Gordon, M.J., and Nicholson, G.A.. Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Blair, I.P., Nash, J., Gordon, M.J., & Nicholson, G.A.. Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin. United States.
Blair, I.P., Nash, J., Gordon, M.J., and Nicholson, G.A.. 1996. "Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_381273,
title = {Prevalence and origin of De Novo duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: First report of a De Novo duplication with a maternal origin},
author = {Blair, I.P. and Nash, J. and Gordon, M.J. and Nicholson, G.A.},
abstractNote = {Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Sporadic cases of CMT have been described since the earliest reports of the disease. The most frequent form of the disorder, CMT1A, is associated with a 1.5-Mb DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2, which segregates with the disease. In order to investigate the prevalence of de novo CMT1A duplications, this study examined 118 duplication-positive CMT1A families. In 10 of these families it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo mutation. By taking into account the ascertainment of families, it can be estimated that {>=}10% of autosomal dominant CMT1 families are due to de novo duplications. The CMT1A duplication is thought to be the product of unequal crossing over between parental chromosome 17 homologues during meiosis. Polymorphic markers from within the duplicated region were used to determine the parental origin of these de novo duplications in eight informative families. Seven were of paternal and one of maternal origin. This study represents the first report of a de novo duplication with a maternal origin and indicates that it is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meioses. Recombination fractions for the region duplicated in CMT1A are larger in females than in males. That suggests that oogenesis may be afforded greater protection from misalignment during synapsis, and/or that there may be lower activity of those factors or mechanisms that lead to unequal crossing over at the CMT1A locus. 41 refs., 2 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Journal of Human Genetics},
number = 3,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 3
}
  • We read with interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prevalence and Origin of De Novo Duplications in Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 1A: First Report of a De Novo Duplication with a Maternal Origin,{close_quotes}. They reported their experience with 10 sporadic cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) in which it was demonstrated that the disease had arisen as the result of a de novo duplication. They analyzed the de novo-duplication families by using microsatellite markers and identified the parental origin of the duplication in eight cases. In one family the duplication was of maternal origin, whereas in the remaining seven cases it was ofmore » paternal origin. The authors concluded that their report was the first evidence of a de novo duplication of maternal origin, suggesting that this is not a phenomenon associated solely with male meiosis. 7 refs.« less
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. One form of CMT, CMT type 1A, is characterized by uniformly decreased nerve conduction velocities, usually shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and is associated with a large submicroscopic duplication of the p11.2-p12 region of chromosome 17. A cohort of 75 unrelated patients diagnosed clinically with CMT and evaluated by electrophysiological methods were analyzed molecularly for the presence of the CMT1A DNA duplication. Three methodologies were used to assess the duplication: Measurement of dosage differences between RFLP alleles, analysis of polymorphic (GT)[sub n] repeats, and detection of a junction fragment by pulsed-fieldmore » gel electrophoresis. The CMT1A duplication was found in 68% of the 63 unrelated CMT patients with electrophysiological studies consistent with CMT type 1 (CMT1). The CMT1A duplication was detected as a de novo event in two CMT1 families. Twelve CMT patients who did not have decreased nerve conduction velocities consistent with a diagnosis of CMT type 2 (CMT2) were found not to have the CMT1A duplication. The most informative molecular method was the detection of the CMT1A duplication-specific junction fragment. Given the high frequency of the CMT1A duplication in CMT patients and the high frequency of new mutations, the authors conclude that a molecular test for the CMT1A DNA duplication is very useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with peripheral neuropathies. 61 refs., 4 figs.« less
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restrictionmore » sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who were unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints located in a 3.2-kb region accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Recently Kwon et al. published in the Journal their work describing linkage of a single large family with an inherited axonal neuropathy to chromosome 3, which they suggest is a second locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 2 and subsequently named {open_quotes}CMT2B.{close_quotes} We think that the diagnostic classification of this family as CMT2 is incorrect, since the subjects have a severe sensory neuropathy that fits within the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type 1 classification of Dyck (1993). Abnormal sensory findings in CMT2 separate it from distal spinal muscular atrophy but are a minor component of clinical symptoms in mostmore » CMT patients, as CMT is primarily a motor neuropathy. When Kwon et al. state that {open_quotes}all [patients] had characteristic findings in their physical examinations, including... evidence of foot sores that were slow to heal, or amputated limbs related to the poorly healing foot ulcers,{close_quotes} it suggests that a different diagnosis is more appropriate. In our experience collecting data on >950 individuals in >60 CMT1, CMT2, CMTX and CMT4 families, we have not seen foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, or amputations. Ulcerations leading to osteomyelitis and amputations are usually associated with severe sensory neuropathies. 16 refs., 1 tab.« less
  • We tested 20 CMT 1 patients characterized according to the criteria of the European CMT consortium by Southern hybridization of MspI restricted genomic DNA with probes pVAW409R1, pVAW412Hec and pEW401HE. In 11 of the 20 CMT 1 cases (55%), we observed a duplication in 17q11.2; one patient had a dinucleotide insertion in exon 6 of the PO-gene (5%). One HNPP case had a typical 17p11.2 deletion. Analysis of CA-repeats was performed with primers RM11GT and Mfd41; SSCP-analysis of the PO, PMP22 and Cx32-genes is in progress. FISH was carried out with probe pVAW409R1. 125 interphase nuclei were analyzed for eachmore » proband by counting the signals per nucleus. Normal cells show a characteristic distribution of signals: 1 signal in 5.9% of nuclei, 2 in 86.3% and 3 in 7.8%. A duplication is indicated by a shift to 3 signals in more than approximately 60% and 2 in less than 25% of the nuclei. In contrast, the 17p11.2 deletion of the HNPP patient shifts to 82.4% of nuclei with a single hybridization signal versus 14.4% with 2 signals. We detected one case with significantly abnormal distribution of interphase nuclei hybridization signals compared to cultures of normal cells and to those with 17p11.2 duplication or deletion: 3.2% nuclei revealed 1 signal, 48.0% two signals and 48.8% 3 signals, indicating a pathogenic but moderate dosis increase compared to the throughout duplicated cases. FISH with probe pVAW409R1 is a versatile tool to detect the HNPP deletion both in interphase nuclei and in metaphase chromosomes. In CMT 1 disease interphase nuclei are required for FISH analysis due to the small duplication of 1.5 Mbp. In contrast to Southern techniques, FISH is able to detect genetic mosaicism.« less