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Title: Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining

Abstract

TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.
  2. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor Facility
  3. Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.
  4. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Systems Div.
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
372094
Report Number(s):
CONF-960202-
ISBN 0-87339-312-0; TRN: 96:024130
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual meeting and exhibition of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS), Anaheim, CA (United States), 4-8 Feb 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Light metals 1996; Hale, W. [ed.] [Anglesey Aluminum Metal Ltd., North Wales (United Kingdom)]; PB: 1304 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; URANIUM; ELECTROREFINING; NEPTUNIUM; PLUTONIUM; AMERICIUM; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; RARE EARTHS; CHLORIDES; LITHIUM CHLORIDES; POTASSIUM CHLORIDES; CADMIUM CHLORIDES; ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS; MOLTEN SALTS; ANODES; CADMIUM; LIQUID METALS; DEPOSITION; CATHODES; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Grimmett, D.L., Fusselman, S.P., Roy, J.J., Gay, R.L., Krueger, C.L., Storvick, T.S., Inoue, T., Hijikata, T., and Takahashi, N. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Grimmett, D.L., Fusselman, S.P., Roy, J.J., Gay, R.L., Krueger, C.L., Storvick, T.S., Inoue, T., Hijikata, T., & Takahashi, N. Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining. United States.
Grimmett, D.L., Fusselman, S.P., Roy, J.J., Gay, R.L., Krueger, C.L., Storvick, T.S., Inoue, T., Hijikata, T., and Takahashi, N. Tue . "Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_372094,
title = {Separation of actinides from lanthanides utilizing molten salt electrorefining},
author = {Grimmett, D.L. and Fusselman, S.P. and Roy, J.J. and Gay, R.L. and Krueger, C.L. and Storvick, T.S. and Inoue, T. and Hijikata, T. and Takahashi, N.},
abstractNote = {TRUMP-S (TRansUranic Management through Pyropartitioning Separation) is a pyrochemical process being developed to separate actinides form fission products in nuclear waste. A key process step involving molten salt electrorefining to separate actinides from lanthanides has been studied on a laboratory scale. Electrorefining of U, Np, Pu, Am, and lanthanide mixtures from molten cadmium at 450 C to a solid cathode utilizing a molten chloride electrolyte resulted in > 99% removal of actinides from the molten cadmium and salt phases. Removal of the last few percent of actinides is accompanied by lowered cathodic current efficiency and some lanthanide codeposition. Actinide/lanthanide separation ratios on the cathode are ordered U > Np > Pu > Am and are consistent with predictions based on equilibrium potentials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}

Book:
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