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Title: Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)

Abstract

From July 1994 through May 1998, direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis has been studied in the laboratory, at a small Pilot Plant, and finally at a larger Pilot Plant within Dow Corning`s Carrollton, Kentucky plant. The system reacts filtered DPR with monomer at high temperature and pressure. The process demonstrates DPR conversion up to 86%. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. A larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning`s Barry, Wales site.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
362599
Report Number(s):
DOE/AL/99566-1
ON: DE99003404; TRN: AHC29926%%254
DOE Contract Number:
FC04-94AL99566
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; PROGRESS REPORT; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS RECOVERY; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; PILOT PLANTS; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SILICON COMPOUNDS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Anderson, K.E.. Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress). United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/362599.
Anderson, K.E.. Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress). United States. doi:10.2172/362599.
Anderson, K.E.. 1998. "Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)". United States. doi:10.2172/362599. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/362599.
@article{osti_362599,
title = {Recovery of valuable chlorosilane intermediates by a novel waste conversion process. Technical report for phase IIIA (final) and phase IIIB (progress)},
author = {Anderson, K.E.},
abstractNote = {From July 1994 through May 1998, direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis has been studied in the laboratory, at a small Pilot Plant, and finally at a larger Pilot Plant within Dow Corning`s Carrollton, Kentucky plant. The system reacts filtered DPR with monomer at high temperature and pressure. The process demonstrates DPR conversion up to 86%. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. A larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed for operation in Europe at Dow Corning`s Barry, Wales site.},
doi = {10.2172/362599},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • From June 1998 through September 1999, direct process residue (DPR, a waste byproduct) hydrogenolysis has been studied at a large pilot plant within Dow Corning's Carrollton, KY, facility. The system reacts filtered DPR with chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and pressure. The process routinely demonstrates DPR conversions from 59% to 89% on a monthly basis. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. An expansion of the current unit's capacity is planned to be on-line by the end of CY2000. Furthermore, a larger DPR hydrogenolysis reactor based on these results is being designed formore » operation in Europe at Dow Corning's Barry, Wales, site.« less
  • Under this project, Dow Corning has studied direct process residue (DPR) hydrogenolysis since 1994. Currently, a commercial scale plant is operating at Dow Corning's Carrollton, Kentucky, facility. A full scale plant has been designed and is presently being constructed at Dow Corning's Barry, Wales (UK), plant. The Barry Plant is scheduled to start up the first half of 2001. The process reacts filtered DPR with chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and pressure. The Carrollton process routinely demonstrates DPR conversions from 59% to 89% on a monthly basis. The reaction product contains high concentrations of valuable monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane andmore » methyldichlorosilane. By converting waste DPR to valuable products, the technology significantly reduces the waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.« less
  • From 1994 to 2001, Dow Corning studied a waste recycling process to recover direct process residues (DPR) resulting from the production of silicone precursors. Over the course of eight years, Dow Corning constructed and operated a pilot plant, a small scale commercial plant, and a full scale plant. The process reacts DPR with hydrogen and chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and high pressure. The process converted 85% of the DPR to valuable chlorosilane monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. When feeding methyltrichlorosilane, the process converted 30% of the MeSiCl3 to other monomers. Alternate co-feed monomers were tested. By converting wastemore » DPR to valuable intermediates, the technology significantly reduces waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.« less
  • This report is the Final Technical Progress Report for ERDA Contract No. E(49-18)-2353 for the EDS (Exxon Donor Solvent) Coal Liquefaction Process Development--Phase IIIA. The contract and this report covers the eighteen-month period January 1, 1976 through June 30, 1977. Funding is shared by ERDA, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Exxon Research and Engineering Company. This Final Report is presented in two volumes: volume I contains the Laboratory Process Research and Development contribution and includes Technical Reporting Categories 1 to 7 and the Appendices for these sections; volume II contains the Engineering Research and Development contribution and includes Technicalmore » Reporting Categories 8 to 11. Results are presented under eleven activities: operation of recycle coal liquefaction units; operation of the one ton per day liquefaction pilot plant; solvent hydrogenation studies; bench-scale units, modeling and correlation studies; product quality studies; coking and gasification studies; construction and operation of the 2 barrel per day coking/gasification pilot plant; commercial study design and cost estimate; cost reduction and laboratory guidance study; pyrolysis and gasification engineering studies; and engineering technology studies.« less
  • The process variable study with Wyoming subbituminous coal continued in the 50 pound-per-day Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) during October. The variables investigated were liquefaction temperature and solvent quality. Studies on the one ton-per-day Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant (CLPP) continued with an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. A high severity vacuum flash study was completed at temperatures up to 735/sup 0/F. Also, the CLPP slurry viscometer was operated in-line with the feed preheaters. An expected slurry viscosity peaking occurred in the 600 to 645/sup 0/F temperature range. The liquefaction model for Wyodak subbituminous coal was completed and is ready formore » incorporation into the EDS Process Model. The model correlates yield as a function of temperature and residence time. The Large Stirred Coking Unit (LSCU) achieved extended operations on Wyodak liquefaction bottoms. Slightly over 1000 pounds of coker liquids were recovered from 6500 pounds of feed. Work continued on establishing the bases for the upcoming EDS Study Design Update. A base case and two sensitivity designs were selected to reflect alternative bottoms processing and hydrogen manufacture configurations. The base case will include steam reforming for hydrogen production and once-through processing of vacuum bottoms in the FLEXICOKING process for fuel production.« less