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Title: Fluidization, combustion and emission behavior of biomass in fluidized bed combustion units

Abstract

Gaseous components were measured over the height and the cross section inside a circulating fluidized bed riser with a thermal power of 60 kW. The combustion behavior of lignite (German brown coal), hard coal, biomass (China reed), and sewage sludge was investigated. The burn-out behavior was investigated by in-situ and real time measurement of the oxygen consumption using solid electrolyte sensor probes within a bubbling fluidized bed combustor with 15 kW thermal power. Non-uniform oxygen concentration profiles were found over the small riser cross-section which differed for the various fuels. The feed location and the fuel distribution also influences the horizontal oxygen profile. The reasons for the non-uniformity of the horizontal oxygen concentration profile are the combustion of volatile matter and the recirculation of char near the walls. A simulation model was developed to calculate the hydrodynamics and the oxygen consumption for the difference fuels inside the CFBC riser.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Otto-von-Guericke-Univ. of Magdeburg (Germany). Dept. Heat Transfer and Energy Economy
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
355799
Report Number(s):
CONF-9705116-
ISBN 0-7918-1557-9; TRN: IM9931%%320
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 14. international conference on fluidized bed combustion, Vancouver (Canada), 11-16 May 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 14. international conference on fluidized bed combustion: Volume 1; Preto, F.D.S. [ed.] [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Energy Technology Centre]; PB: 666 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS; PERFORMANCE; LIGNITE; ANTHRACITE; REEDS; SEWAGE SLUDGE; COMBUSTION PROPERTIES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; HYDRODYNAMICS; FUEL-AIR RATIO

Citation Formats

Kaeferstein, P., Tepper, H., Gohla, M., and Reimer, H. Fluidization, combustion and emission behavior of biomass in fluidized bed combustion units. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Kaeferstein, P., Tepper, H., Gohla, M., & Reimer, H. Fluidization, combustion and emission behavior of biomass in fluidized bed combustion units. United States.
Kaeferstein, P., Tepper, H., Gohla, M., and Reimer, H. 1997. "Fluidization, combustion and emission behavior of biomass in fluidized bed combustion units". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_355799,
title = {Fluidization, combustion and emission behavior of biomass in fluidized bed combustion units},
author = {Kaeferstein, P. and Tepper, H. and Gohla, M. and Reimer, H.},
abstractNote = {Gaseous components were measured over the height and the cross section inside a circulating fluidized bed riser with a thermal power of 60 kW. The combustion behavior of lignite (German brown coal), hard coal, biomass (China reed), and sewage sludge was investigated. The burn-out behavior was investigated by in-situ and real time measurement of the oxygen consumption using solid electrolyte sensor probes within a bubbling fluidized bed combustor with 15 kW thermal power. Non-uniform oxygen concentration profiles were found over the small riser cross-section which differed for the various fuels. The feed location and the fuel distribution also influences the horizontal oxygen profile. The reasons for the non-uniformity of the horizontal oxygen concentration profile are the combustion of volatile matter and the recirculation of char near the walls. A simulation model was developed to calculate the hydrodynamics and the oxygen consumption for the difference fuels inside the CFBC riser.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month =
}

Conference:
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