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Title: Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

Abstract

The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Twenty-eight tanks have a double shell and are constructed of welded ASTM A537-Class 1 (UNS K02400), ASTM A515-Grade 60 (UNS K02401), or ASTM A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) material. The inner tanks of the double-shell tanks (DSTS) were stress relieved following fabrication. One hundred and forty-nine tanks have a single shell, also constructed of welded mild steel, but not stress relieved following fabrication. Tank waste is in liquid, solid, and sludge forms. Tanks also contain a vapor space above the solid and liquid waste regions. The composition of the waste varies from tank to tank but generally has a high pH (>12) and contains sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, and other minor radioactive constituents resulting from plutonium separation processes. Leaks began to appear in the single-shell tanks shortly after the introduction of nitrate-based wastes in the 1950s. Leaks are now confirmed or suspected to be present in a significant number of single-shell tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported as nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting. Previous efforts to monitor internal corrosion of wastemore » tank systems have included linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrical resistance techniques. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for detection of localized corrosion (pitting and SCC). The Savannah River Site (SRS) investigated the characterization of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion in 1993, but the tests were not conclusive. The SRS effort has recently been revived and additional testing is underway. For many years, EN has been observed during corrosion and other electrochemical reactions, and the phenomenon is well established. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (< 1 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. Laboratory studies and recent reports on field applications have reported that EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A two year laboratory study was started at Hanford in 1995 to provide a technical basis for using EN in Hanford nuclear waste tanks. Based on this study, a prototype system was constructed and deployed in DST 241-AZ-101 in August, 1996. Based on the successful demonstration of this prototype for more than a year, a first-generation full-scale system was designed and installed into DST 241-AN-107 in September 1997. This document summarizes the design and operational requirements of the second-generation full-scale system scheduled for deployment into 241-AY-102.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
353279
Report Number(s):
HNF-2517
ON: DE99050632; BR: EW4010000; TRN: AHC29923%%111
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 2 Apr 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; STORAGE FACILITIES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; CARBON STEELS; PITTING CORROSION; STRESS CORROSION; MONITORING; ON-LINE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS; DESIGN; OPERATION; HANFORD RESERVATION

Citation Formats

Edgemon, G.L. Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/353279.
Edgemon, G.L. Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system. United States. doi:10.2172/353279.
Edgemon, G.L. Thu . "Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system". United States. doi:10.2172/353279. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/353279.
@article{osti_353279,
title = {Design of second generation Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system},
author = {Edgemon, G.L.},
abstractNote = {The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste tanks that store approximately 253 million liters of radioactive waste from 50 years of plutonium production. Twenty-eight tanks have a double shell and are constructed of welded ASTM A537-Class 1 (UNS K02400), ASTM A515-Grade 60 (UNS K02401), or ASTM A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) material. The inner tanks of the double-shell tanks (DSTS) were stress relieved following fabrication. One hundred and forty-nine tanks have a single shell, also constructed of welded mild steel, but not stress relieved following fabrication. Tank waste is in liquid, solid, and sludge forms. Tanks also contain a vapor space above the solid and liquid waste regions. The composition of the waste varies from tank to tank but generally has a high pH (>12) and contains sodium nitrate, sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, and other minor radioactive constituents resulting from plutonium separation processes. Leaks began to appear in the single-shell tanks shortly after the introduction of nitrate-based wastes in the 1950s. Leaks are now confirmed or suspected to be present in a significant number of single-shell tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported as nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting. Previous efforts to monitor internal corrosion of waste tank systems have included linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrical resistance techniques. These techniques are most effective for monitoring uniform corrosion, but are not well suited for detection of localized corrosion (pitting and SCC). The Savannah River Site (SRS) investigated the characterization of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion in 1993, but the tests were not conclusive. The SRS effort has recently been revived and additional testing is underway. For many years, EN has been observed during corrosion and other electrochemical reactions, and the phenomenon is well established. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (< 1 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. Laboratory studies and recent reports on field applications have reported that EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A two year laboratory study was started at Hanford in 1995 to provide a technical basis for using EN in Hanford nuclear waste tanks. Based on this study, a prototype system was constructed and deployed in DST 241-AZ-101 in August, 1996. Based on the successful demonstration of this prototype for more than a year, a first-generation full-scale system was designed and installed into DST 241-AN-107 in September 1997. This document summarizes the design and operational requirements of the second-generation full-scale system scheduled for deployment into 241-AY-102.},
doi = {10.2172/353279},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {4}
}