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Title: The power of brand equity: Exploiting a singular incumbent advantage

Abstract

The US utility ``brandscape`` resembles feudal Europe: There are numerous adjacent fiefdoms where the brand equity within each falls off precipitously outside territory borders. Those who want to ``go national`` face a protracted, expensive task dislodging local incumbents. With the onset of competition in retail electric power markets, America`s last great deregulation is well under way. Customers are pressing their suppliers to reduce energy bills by opening markets to competition. Deregulation of power generation, which has moved quickly in recent years throughout North America and Europe, is eroding the traditional pillars of value: franchise protection, cost-based pricing, and rate-of-return regulation. The stakes are high for incumbent utilities, given that electric sales in the United States alone total more than $200 billion, greater than sales in telecommunications, air transportation, or railroads. Add in natural gas ($5 billion or so) and related energy products and services, and it is clear why upstart entrepreneurs and outsider firms are attracted to the opportunities opened up by deregulation.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Mercer Management Consulting, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
352509
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electricity Journal; Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ELECTRIC POWER; DEREGULATION; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; RETAIL PRICES; RETAILERS; COMPETITION; ENERGY EXPENSES

Citation Formats

Almquist, E., and Piotroski, S.A. The power of brand equity: Exploiting a singular incumbent advantage. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1016/S1040-6190(98)00124-9.
Almquist, E., & Piotroski, S.A. The power of brand equity: Exploiting a singular incumbent advantage. United States. doi:10.1016/S1040-6190(98)00124-9.
Almquist, E., and Piotroski, S.A. Mon . "The power of brand equity: Exploiting a singular incumbent advantage". United States. doi:10.1016/S1040-6190(98)00124-9.
@article{osti_352509,
title = {The power of brand equity: Exploiting a singular incumbent advantage},
author = {Almquist, E. and Piotroski, S.A.},
abstractNote = {The US utility ``brandscape`` resembles feudal Europe: There are numerous adjacent fiefdoms where the brand equity within each falls off precipitously outside territory borders. Those who want to ``go national`` face a protracted, expensive task dislodging local incumbents. With the onset of competition in retail electric power markets, America`s last great deregulation is well under way. Customers are pressing their suppliers to reduce energy bills by opening markets to competition. Deregulation of power generation, which has moved quickly in recent years throughout North America and Europe, is eroding the traditional pillars of value: franchise protection, cost-based pricing, and rate-of-return regulation. The stakes are high for incumbent utilities, given that electric sales in the United States alone total more than $200 billion, greater than sales in telecommunications, air transportation, or railroads. Add in natural gas ($5 billion or so) and related energy products and services, and it is clear why upstart entrepreneurs and outsider firms are attracted to the opportunities opened up by deregulation.},
doi = {10.1016/S1040-6190(98)00124-9},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999}
}
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