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Title: PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques

Abstract

Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)
  2. Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Hydrogen Association, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
330662
Report Number(s):
CONF-970385-PROC.
ON: DE99001002; TRN: IM9915%%178
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-94CE50389
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. annual U.S. National Hydrogen Association meeting, Alexandria, VA (United States), 11-13 Mar 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 8. annual U.S. hydrogen meeting: Proceedings; PB: 546 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; SOLID ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS; HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS; COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN; COST ESTIMATION

Citation Formats

Lomax, F.D. Jr., James, B.D., and Mooradian, R.P. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Lomax, F.D. Jr., James, B.D., & Mooradian, R.P. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques. United States.
Lomax, F.D. Jr., James, B.D., and Mooradian, R.P. Wed . "PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/330662.
@article{osti_330662,
title = {PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques},
author = {Lomax, F.D. Jr. and James, B.D. and Mooradian, R.P.},
abstractNote = {Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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  • The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.
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