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Title: Reducing landfill gas emissions and energy costs

Abstract

Landfill gas (LFG) is collected from the White Street Municipal Sanitary Landfill in Greensboro, North Carolina. This gas is transported by a three mile pipeline to Cone Mill`s White Oak Plant where it is burned in a retrofitted boiler to generate process and heating steam. The operation started in December, 1996 and by early 1997 sufficient gas was available to generate 30,000 lb/hr of 350 psig saturated steam on a continuous basis. Since then, the project has increased the capacity of the LFG production by one-third to just under 2 million standard cubic feet per day (MMSCFD) with the addition of new collection wells as areas of the landfill are closed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
318956
Report Number(s):
CONF-980426-
Journal ID: ISSN 0097-2126; TRN: IM9909%%130
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: American power conference, Chicago, IL (United States), 14-16 Apr 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the American Power Conference: Volume 60-1; McBride, A.E. [ed.] [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)]; PB: 613 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SANITARY LANDFILLS; METHANE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; ENERGY CONSERVATION; WASTE PRODUCT UTILIZATION; STEAM GENERATION; PROCESS HEAT

Citation Formats

Dailey, A. Reducing landfill gas emissions and energy costs. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Dailey, A. Reducing landfill gas emissions and energy costs. United States.
Dailey, A. 1998. "Reducing landfill gas emissions and energy costs". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_318956,
title = {Reducing landfill gas emissions and energy costs},
author = {Dailey, A.},
abstractNote = {Landfill gas (LFG) is collected from the White Street Municipal Sanitary Landfill in Greensboro, North Carolina. This gas is transported by a three mile pipeline to Cone Mill`s White Oak Plant where it is burned in a retrofitted boiler to generate process and heating steam. The operation started in December, 1996 and by early 1997 sufficient gas was available to generate 30,000 lb/hr of 350 psig saturated steam on a continuous basis. Since then, the project has increased the capacity of the LFG production by one-third to just under 2 million standard cubic feet per day (MMSCFD) with the addition of new collection wells as areas of the landfill are closed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

Conference:
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