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Title: Chassis dynamometer study of emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles

Abstract

Regulated emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles were measured on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer via three driving cycles using a low-sulfur diesel fuel. Emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC), and PM sulfate fraction were measured. For hot start tests, emissions ranged from 0.30 to 7.43 g/mi (mean 1.96) for PM; 4.15--54.0 g/mi (mean 23.3) for NO{sub x}; 2.09--86.2 g/mi (mean 19.5) for CO; and 0.25--8.25 g/mi (mean 1.70) for THC. When emissions are converted to a g/gal basis, the effect of driving cycle is eliminated for NO{sub x} and largely eliminated for PM. Sulfate comprised less than 1% of the emitted PM for all vehicles and test cycles. A strong correlation is observed between emissions of CO and PM. Cold starting at 77 F produced an 11% increase in PM emissions. Multivariate regression analyses indicate that in-use PM emissions have decreased at a slower rate than anticipated based on the stricter engine certification test standards put into effect since 1985. NO{sub x} emissions do not decrease with model year for the vehicles tested here. Smoke opacity measurements are not well correlated with mass emissions of regulated pollutants.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
318694
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: 15 Jan 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; EXHAUST GASES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; DIESEL FUELS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; PARTICULATES; NITROGEN OXIDES; CARBON MONOXIDE; HYDROCARBONS; SULFATES; DYNAMOMETERS

Citation Formats

Yanowitz, J., Graboski, M.S., Ryan, L.B.A., Alleman, T.L., and McCormick, R.L.. Chassis dynamometer study of emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es980458p.
Yanowitz, J., Graboski, M.S., Ryan, L.B.A., Alleman, T.L., & McCormick, R.L.. Chassis dynamometer study of emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles. United States. doi:10.1021/es980458p.
Yanowitz, J., Graboski, M.S., Ryan, L.B.A., Alleman, T.L., and McCormick, R.L.. 1999. "Chassis dynamometer study of emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles". United States. doi:10.1021/es980458p.
@article{osti_318694,
title = {Chassis dynamometer study of emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles},
author = {Yanowitz, J. and Graboski, M.S. and Ryan, L.B.A. and Alleman, T.L. and McCormick, R.L.},
abstractNote = {Regulated emissions from 21 in-use heavy-duty diesel vehicles were measured on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer via three driving cycles using a low-sulfur diesel fuel. Emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC), and PM sulfate fraction were measured. For hot start tests, emissions ranged from 0.30 to 7.43 g/mi (mean 1.96) for PM; 4.15--54.0 g/mi (mean 23.3) for NO{sub x}; 2.09--86.2 g/mi (mean 19.5) for CO; and 0.25--8.25 g/mi (mean 1.70) for THC. When emissions are converted to a g/gal basis, the effect of driving cycle is eliminated for NO{sub x} and largely eliminated for PM. Sulfate comprised less than 1% of the emitted PM for all vehicles and test cycles. A strong correlation is observed between emissions of CO and PM. Cold starting at 77 F produced an 11% increase in PM emissions. Multivariate regression analyses indicate that in-use PM emissions have decreased at a slower rate than anticipated based on the stricter engine certification test standards put into effect since 1985. NO{sub x} emissions do not decrease with model year for the vehicles tested here. Smoke opacity measurements are not well correlated with mass emissions of regulated pollutants.},
doi = {10.1021/es980458p},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month = 1
}
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