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Title: Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass

Abstract

To determine their technical and economic viability and to provide insight into where each technology is in its development cycle, different options to produce hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass were studied. Additionally, costs for storing and transporting hydrogen were determined for different hydrogen quantities and storage times. The analysis of hydrogen from sunlight examined the selling price of hydrogen from two technologies: direct photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of sunlight and photovoltaic (PV)-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. The wind analysis was based on wind-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. In addition to the base case analyses, which assume that hydrogen is the sole product, three alternative scenarios explore the economic impact of integrating the PV- and wind-based systems with the electric utility grid. Results show that PEC hydrogen production has the potential to be economically feasible. Additionally, the economics of the PV and wind electrolysis systems are improved by interaction with the grid. The analysis of hydrogen from biomass focused on three gasification technologies. The systems are: low pressure, indirectly-heated gasification followed by steam reforming; high pressure, oxygen-blown gasification followed by steam reforming; and pyrolysis followed by partial oxidation. For each of the systems studied, the downstream process steps includemore » shift conversion followed by hydrogen purification. Only the low pressure system produces hydrogen within the range of the current industry selling prices (typically $0.7--$2/kg, or $5--14/GJ on a HHV basis). A sensitivity analysis showed that, for the other two systems, in order to bring the hydrogen selling price down to $2/kg, negative-priced feedstocks would be required.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
305609
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-570-25315-Vol.1; CONF-980440-Vol.1
ON: DE98007507; TRN: IM9906%%289
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: US DOE hydrogen program technical review meeting, Alexandria, VA (United States), 28-30 Apr 1998; Other Information: PBD: Aug 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review: Volume 1; PB: 425 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN FUEL; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; HYDROGEN STORAGE; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; PHOTOELECTROLYSIS; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SUPPLIES; WIND TURBINES; BIOMASS; STEAM REFORMER PROCESSES; GASIFICATION; PYROLYSIS; PARTIAL OXIDATION PROCESSES; TRANSPORT; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Mann, M. K., Spath, P. L., and Amos, W. A. Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/305609.
Mann, M. K., Spath, P. L., & Amos, W. A. Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass. United States. doi:10.2172/305609.
Mann, M. K., Spath, P. L., and Amos, W. A. Sat . "Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass". United States. doi:10.2172/305609. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/305609.
@article{osti_305609,
title = {Technoeconomic analysis of different options for the production of hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass},
author = {Mann, M. K. and Spath, P. L. and Amos, W. A.},
abstractNote = {To determine their technical and economic viability and to provide insight into where each technology is in its development cycle, different options to produce hydrogen from sunlight, wind, and biomass were studied. Additionally, costs for storing and transporting hydrogen were determined for different hydrogen quantities and storage times. The analysis of hydrogen from sunlight examined the selling price of hydrogen from two technologies: direct photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of sunlight and photovoltaic (PV)-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. The wind analysis was based on wind-generated electricity production followed by electrolysis. In addition to the base case analyses, which assume that hydrogen is the sole product, three alternative scenarios explore the economic impact of integrating the PV- and wind-based systems with the electric utility grid. Results show that PEC hydrogen production has the potential to be economically feasible. Additionally, the economics of the PV and wind electrolysis systems are improved by interaction with the grid. The analysis of hydrogen from biomass focused on three gasification technologies. The systems are: low pressure, indirectly-heated gasification followed by steam reforming; high pressure, oxygen-blown gasification followed by steam reforming; and pyrolysis followed by partial oxidation. For each of the systems studied, the downstream process steps include shift conversion followed by hydrogen purification. Only the low pressure system produces hydrogen within the range of the current industry selling prices (typically $0.7--$2/kg, or $5--14/GJ on a HHV basis). A sensitivity analysis showed that, for the other two systems, in order to bring the hydrogen selling price down to $2/kg, negative-priced feedstocks would be required.},
doi = {10.2172/305609},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {8}
}