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Title: The enforcement provisions of the Clean Air Act - not the same old Section 113

Abstract

The Clean Air Act ({open_quotes}CAA{close_quotes}) of 1990 was in many respects a major overhaul of the previous versions of the Clean Air Act although it retained most of the preexisting major programs such as the basic National Ambient Air Quality Standards ({open_quotes}NAAQS{close_quotes}) scheme, PSD, new source performance standards, regulation of toxic air pollutants, and the like. The 1990 Act strengthened the enforcement provisions of the Act by enhancing the enforcement powers of the Environmental Protection Agency ({open_quotes}EPA{close_quotes}) of {section}113. For example, the criminal enforcement provisions of {section}113 are expanded both in the range of punishment and in the kinds of activities which are subject to criminal enforcement. Moreover, the Act now contains a number of additional enforcement provisions in addition to those found in {section}113. The purpose of this paper is to discuss both the {section}113 provision and as well, identify those enforcement provisions found outside {section}113. The latter provisions will be taken up first and addressed by Titles of the Act. The discussion of specific sections and subsections of the CAA are necessarily brief and in the nature of highlighting of particular features; like the rest of the CAA, careful reading and analysis is a requirement for full understanding.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
269133
Report Number(s):
CONF-960107-
TRN: 96:002013-0006
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: annual exhibition and conference for environment, health and safety in the oil, gas and petrochemical industries, Houston, TX (United States), 30 Jan - 1 Feb 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Energy week `96 - PETRO-SAFE; PB: 291 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; CLEAN AIR ACTS; ENFORCEMENT; OIL FIELDS; COMPLIANCE; AIR QUALITY

Citation Formats

Benthul, H.R.. The enforcement provisions of the Clean Air Act - not the same old Section 113. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Benthul, H.R.. The enforcement provisions of the Clean Air Act - not the same old Section 113. United States.
Benthul, H.R.. 1996. "The enforcement provisions of the Clean Air Act - not the same old Section 113". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_269133,
title = {The enforcement provisions of the Clean Air Act - not the same old Section 113},
author = {Benthul, H.R.},
abstractNote = {The Clean Air Act ({open_quotes}CAA{close_quotes}) of 1990 was in many respects a major overhaul of the previous versions of the Clean Air Act although it retained most of the preexisting major programs such as the basic National Ambient Air Quality Standards ({open_quotes}NAAQS{close_quotes}) scheme, PSD, new source performance standards, regulation of toxic air pollutants, and the like. The 1990 Act strengthened the enforcement provisions of the Act by enhancing the enforcement powers of the Environmental Protection Agency ({open_quotes}EPA{close_quotes}) of {section}113. For example, the criminal enforcement provisions of {section}113 are expanded both in the range of punishment and in the kinds of activities which are subject to criminal enforcement. Moreover, the Act now contains a number of additional enforcement provisions in addition to those found in {section}113. The purpose of this paper is to discuss both the {section}113 provision and as well, identify those enforcement provisions found outside {section}113. The latter provisions will be taken up first and addressed by Titles of the Act. The discussion of specific sections and subsections of the CAA are necessarily brief and in the nature of highlighting of particular features; like the rest of the CAA, careful reading and analysis is a requirement for full understanding.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
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