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Title: Process control strategies key to refining operations

Abstract

Panelists and attendees at the most recent National Petroleum Refiners Association Question and Answer Session on Refining and Petrochemical Technology discussed process control issues in detail. Participants shared their experiences on: personal computers (PCs) in process control; programmable logic control issues; neural networks; fieldbus technology; and statistical analyses of refinery data. Questions and answers on each of these subjects are presented.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
260678
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil and Gas Journal; Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: 30; Other Information: PBD: 22 Jul 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; MEETINGS; PROCESS CONTROL; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; MATHEMATICAL LOGIC; EXPERT SYSTEMS; DATA ANALYSIS; STATISTICS; PERSONAL COMPUTERS; ON-LINE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEMS; DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

NONE. Process control strategies key to refining operations. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
NONE. Process control strategies key to refining operations. United States.
NONE. 1996. "Process control strategies key to refining operations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_260678,
title = {Process control strategies key to refining operations},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {Panelists and attendees at the most recent National Petroleum Refiners Association Question and Answer Session on Refining and Petrochemical Technology discussed process control issues in detail. Participants shared their experiences on: personal computers (PCs) in process control; programmable logic control issues; neural networks; fieldbus technology; and statistical analyses of refinery data. Questions and answers on each of these subjects are presented.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil and Gas Journal},
number = 30,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 7
}
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