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Title: The omega method for discharge rate evolution

Abstract

In 1986 the present author published a generalized correlation for one-component homogeneous equilibrium flashing choked flow (where the lines represent best-fit to the eleven fluids tested). Since then no fewer than ten publications have appeared, extending the methodology (or correlations) to cover non-flashing two-phase flow, flashing flow with noncondensables, two-phase flow in pipes with elevation change, subcooled inlet flashing flow, multicomponent systems, and safety relief valve sizing. Such a methodology has come to be known as the {open_quotes}omega{close_quotes} method since an {omega} parameter comprising of dimensionless physical property groups was introduced to successfully characterize a wide range of fluid conditions. This paper serves to review its evolution as well as update its recent developments. Relative to a single-phase system, two-phase flow has two additional degrees of freedom - one due to thermal non-equilibrium effect, and the other due to mechanical non-equilibrium resulting in slip between phases. It has been generally accepted that for high momentum discharges of a two-phase system, both thermal equilibrium and mechanical equilibrium can be assumed. This is the classical homogeneous (i.e. no slip) equilibrium flow model (HEM). Evaluation of this HEM usually involves a lengthy procedure and requires detailed thermodynamic property tabulation. The {omega} method wasmore » hence proposed as an alternative and has the attribute of bringing out key physical parameters in connection with the compressible nature of a two-phase flow system. 22 refs., 15 figs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Leung Inc., Darien, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
255386
Report Number(s):
CONF-9508216-
TRN: 96:002769-0014
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on runaway reactions and pressure relief design, Boston, MA (United States), 2-4 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of International symposium on runaway reactions and pressure relief design; Melhem, G.A.; Fisher, H.G. [eds.]; PB: 779 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 40 CHEMISTRY; NOZZLES; TWO-PHASE FLOW; PIPES; FLOW RATE; CALCULATION METHODS; RELIEF VALVES; FLASHING; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIONS; CHEMICAL EXPLOSIVES

Citation Formats

Leung, J C. The omega method for discharge rate evolution. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Leung, J C. The omega method for discharge rate evolution. United States.
Leung, J C. Sun . "The omega method for discharge rate evolution". United States.
@article{osti_255386,
title = {The omega method for discharge rate evolution},
author = {Leung, J C},
abstractNote = {In 1986 the present author published a generalized correlation for one-component homogeneous equilibrium flashing choked flow (where the lines represent best-fit to the eleven fluids tested). Since then no fewer than ten publications have appeared, extending the methodology (or correlations) to cover non-flashing two-phase flow, flashing flow with noncondensables, two-phase flow in pipes with elevation change, subcooled inlet flashing flow, multicomponent systems, and safety relief valve sizing. Such a methodology has come to be known as the {open_quotes}omega{close_quotes} method since an {omega} parameter comprising of dimensionless physical property groups was introduced to successfully characterize a wide range of fluid conditions. This paper serves to review its evolution as well as update its recent developments. Relative to a single-phase system, two-phase flow has two additional degrees of freedom - one due to thermal non-equilibrium effect, and the other due to mechanical non-equilibrium resulting in slip between phases. It has been generally accepted that for high momentum discharges of a two-phase system, both thermal equilibrium and mechanical equilibrium can be assumed. This is the classical homogeneous (i.e. no slip) equilibrium flow model (HEM). Evaluation of this HEM usually involves a lengthy procedure and requires detailed thermodynamic property tabulation. The {omega} method was hence proposed as an alternative and has the attribute of bringing out key physical parameters in connection with the compressible nature of a two-phase flow system. 22 refs., 15 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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