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Title: The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents

Abstract

Toxic metals entering surface or ground water from sources such as metal finishing shop spills and abandoned mines can pose a significant threat to public health and the environment. Ion flotation and similar foam separation techniques show great promise for treating dilute, metal-contaminated solutions, and could also be used to treat effluents from many minerals and metallurgical processing operations prior to discharge. In ion flotation, an appropriate collector is added to the solution to form hydrophobic complexes with the metal ions. These metal-bearing species are then removed by flotation, usually with trace addition of a frother to stabilize the foam. In an effort to better understand the underlying scientific and engineering principles that determine the performance of ion flotation, the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been studied using laboratory scale flotation columns in batch mode. The effects of the superficial air velocity, solution and froth height, nature of the collector, collector:metal-ion ratio, ionic strength and several frothers at low concentrations on the flotation kinetics are reported. Finally, results are presented on methods that might allow regeneration of collector and recovery of by-product metal from the foam product.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
248216
Report Number(s):
CONF-9510120-
ISBN 0-87335-142-8; TRN: IM9628%%316
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: 19. international mineral processing congress, San Francisco, CA (United States), 22-27 Oct 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 19. international mineral processing congress: Precious metals processing and mineral waste and the environment. Volume 4; PB: 210 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WASTE WATER; DEMETALLIZATION; COPPER; REMOVAL; LEAD; CADMIUM; CHROMIUM; FLOTATION; METALS; METAL INDUSTRY; MINERAL INDUSTRY; SEPARATION EQUIPMENT; PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS; PRECIPITATION; ELECTROLYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Doyle, F.M., Duyvesteyn, S., and Sreenivasarao, K. The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Doyle, F.M., Duyvesteyn, S., & Sreenivasarao, K. The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents. United States.
Doyle, F.M., Duyvesteyn, S., and Sreenivasarao, K. Sun . "The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_248216,
title = {The use of ion flotation for detoxification of metal-contaminated waters and process effluents},
author = {Doyle, F.M. and Duyvesteyn, S. and Sreenivasarao, K.},
abstractNote = {Toxic metals entering surface or ground water from sources such as metal finishing shop spills and abandoned mines can pose a significant threat to public health and the environment. Ion flotation and similar foam separation techniques show great promise for treating dilute, metal-contaminated solutions, and could also be used to treat effluents from many minerals and metallurgical processing operations prior to discharge. In ion flotation, an appropriate collector is added to the solution to form hydrophobic complexes with the metal ions. These metal-bearing species are then removed by flotation, usually with trace addition of a frother to stabilize the foam. In an effort to better understand the underlying scientific and engineering principles that determine the performance of ion flotation, the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been studied using laboratory scale flotation columns in batch mode. The effects of the superficial air velocity, solution and froth height, nature of the collector, collector:metal-ion ratio, ionic strength and several frothers at low concentrations on the flotation kinetics are reported. Finally, results are presented on methods that might allow regeneration of collector and recovery of by-product metal from the foam product.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Book:
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