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Title: Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers

Abstract

Time-of-travel transport estimation is employed to predict contaminant migration in karst aquifers. Estimation of time-of-travel transport is conditioned on the set of hydraulic-flow that occur within karst conduits. These parameters are applied to surface-water models to reflect time-of-travel flow and geometries are determined empirically through quantitative ground-water tracing studies. Quantitative ground-water tracing studies are based on a comprehensive tracer budget and numerical analysis of the tracer recovery curves for time-of-travel parameters that include mean residence time, mean flow velocity, longitudinal dispersivity, karst conduit volume, cross-sectional area, diameter, and hydraulic depth for use in surface-water models.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). National Center for Environmental Assessment
OSTI Identifier:
241305
Report Number(s):
PB-96-159462/XAB
TRN: 61211419
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; AQUIFERS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; TRACER TECHNIQUES; POLLUTANTS; MIGRATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Field, M.S. Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Field, M.S. Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers. United States.
Field, M.S. 1996. "Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_241305,
title = {Predicting contaminant migration in karst aquifers},
author = {Field, M.S.},
abstractNote = {Time-of-travel transport estimation is employed to predict contaminant migration in karst aquifers. Estimation of time-of-travel transport is conditioned on the set of hydraulic-flow that occur within karst conduits. These parameters are applied to surface-water models to reflect time-of-travel flow and geometries are determined empirically through quantitative ground-water tracing studies. Quantitative ground-water tracing studies are based on a comprehensive tracer budget and numerical analysis of the tracer recovery curves for time-of-travel parameters that include mean residence time, mean flow velocity, longitudinal dispersivity, karst conduit volume, cross-sectional area, diameter, and hydraulic depth for use in surface-water models.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:
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