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Title: Bone marrow adsorbed dose of rhenium-186-HEDP and the relationship with decreased platelet counts

Abstract

Rhenium-186(Sn)-1,1-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-HEDP) has been used for palliation of metastatic bone pain. The purpose of this study was to find a relationship between the bone marrow absorbed dose and the toxicity, expressed as the percentage decrease in the peripheral blood platelet count. The bone marrow absorbed dose was calculated according to the MIRD model using data obtained from ten treatments of patients suffering from metastatic prostate cancer; noninvasive and pharmacokinetic method were used. The bone marrow doses were related to toxicity using the pharmacodynamic sigmoid E{sub max} model. The mean bone marrow absorbed doses using the noninvasive and pharmacokinetic methods were in a close range to each other (1.07 mGy/MBq and 1.02 mGy/MBq, respectively). There was a good relationship between the toxicity and the bone marrow absorbed dose (r = 0.80). Furthermore, the EDrm{sub 50} (i.e., the bone marrow absorbed dose producing a 50% platelet decrease) to bone marrow for {sup 186}Re-HEDP was on the order of 2 Gy. Although the function of normal bone marrow is affected by metastases in patients with metastatic bone disease, the MIRD model can be used to relate toxicity to the bone marrow absorbed dose after a therapeutic dosage of {sup 186}Re-HEDP. 33more » refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
240982
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Nuclear Medicine; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BONE MARROW; METASTASES; RHENIUM 186; TOXICITY; ADSORPTION; BLOOD PLATELETS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PROSTATE; NEOPLASMS; THERAPY; RADIATION DOSES; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Klerk, J.M.H. de, Dieren, E.B. van, and Schip, A.D. van het. Bone marrow adsorbed dose of rhenium-186-HEDP and the relationship with decreased platelet counts. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Klerk, J.M.H. de, Dieren, E.B. van, & Schip, A.D. van het. Bone marrow adsorbed dose of rhenium-186-HEDP and the relationship with decreased platelet counts. United States.
Klerk, J.M.H. de, Dieren, E.B. van, and Schip, A.D. van het. 1996. "Bone marrow adsorbed dose of rhenium-186-HEDP and the relationship with decreased platelet counts". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_240982,
title = {Bone marrow adsorbed dose of rhenium-186-HEDP and the relationship with decreased platelet counts},
author = {Klerk, J.M.H. de and Dieren, E.B. van and Schip, A.D. van het},
abstractNote = {Rhenium-186(Sn)-1,1-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-HEDP) has been used for palliation of metastatic bone pain. The purpose of this study was to find a relationship between the bone marrow absorbed dose and the toxicity, expressed as the percentage decrease in the peripheral blood platelet count. The bone marrow absorbed dose was calculated according to the MIRD model using data obtained from ten treatments of patients suffering from metastatic prostate cancer; noninvasive and pharmacokinetic method were used. The bone marrow doses were related to toxicity using the pharmacodynamic sigmoid E{sub max} model. The mean bone marrow absorbed doses using the noninvasive and pharmacokinetic methods were in a close range to each other (1.07 mGy/MBq and 1.02 mGy/MBq, respectively). There was a good relationship between the toxicity and the bone marrow absorbed dose (r = 0.80). Furthermore, the EDrm{sub 50} (i.e., the bone marrow absorbed dose producing a 50% platelet decrease) to bone marrow for {sup 186}Re-HEDP was on the order of 2 Gy. Although the function of normal bone marrow is affected by metastases in patients with metastatic bone disease, the MIRD model can be used to relate toxicity to the bone marrow absorbed dose after a therapeutic dosage of {sup 186}Re-HEDP. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Medicine},
number = 1,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 1
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A film-ratio method was devised in which absolute counts of suspended bone marrow cells were acheived by means of a lasting film on a microscopic slide, prepared with a medium containing standard particles (spores) in a known concentration. The ratio of cells to spores was determined by microscopic examination of the film. The marrow cell count = R (cell-to-particle ratio in film) times N (number of standard particles in marrow suspension). Such films have the advantage of not requiring immediate counting. Their examination is no more laborious than the conventional method (chamber count plus differential count). Uniformity trials were carriedmore » out, sources of variance were explored, and results were compared with those obtained with the hemacytometer and with the electronic counter. The method was shown to be practical in a trial experiment dealing with changes in the marrow of irradiated mice. (auth)« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A Monte Carlo model has been developed for simulation of dose delivery to skeletal metastases by the bone surface-seeking radiopharmaceutical {sup 186}Re(Sn)-HEDP. The model simulates: (1) the heterogeneous small scale geometry of the soft tissue/bone-spicule structure in the lesions as determined by histomorphometric measurements of histologic specimens, (2) the small scale spatial distribution of the radiopharmaceutical on the lesion bone spicule surface as determined by autoradiography, and (3) the {sup 186}Re beta and conversion electron decay spectrum and the associated charged particle transport within the modeled geometries. The results are compared with the commonly employed uniform lesion model, which assumes:more » (1) homogenous lesion morphology, (2) uniform distribution of radioactivity within the lesion, and (3) complete energy deposition by charged particles within the lesion due to decay of this activity. Gamma and x-ray photons from the {sup 186}Re spectrum were assumed to escape from the lesion volume in both models. Results show a significant dependence on the bone volume fraction and hence on the histology of the lesion (lytic, blastic or mixed). The uniform lesion model calculations under-estimate the radiation dose to blastic lesions by as much as a factor of 1.8. However, for lytic lesions with low bone volume fractions, both models provide similar dose values. These new model calculations provide a mechanism for optimizing treatment planning and dose response evaluations of therapeutic bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. 24 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.« less