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Title: World Energy Council 16. Congress review

Abstract

The sixteenth World Energy Council (WEC) Congress was hosted in Tokyo, Japan, October 8--13, 1995, with a theme of ``Energy for Our Common World: What will the future ask of us?`` Participants in the congress examined several fundamental issues of these times: hot to provide the energy services for an increasing world population, especially in developing countries; hot to meet local, regional, and global environmental and social concerns; how to adapt to changing markets and institutions; how to respond to diversified transportation and other end use patterns reflecting human behavior; how to deal with the emerging interdependence of energy markets; and what action to be pursued individually and collectively. This article summarizes the highlights of the congress, and includes an overview of the World Energy Council (WEC), a synopsis of the events, summaries of the technical program division addresses, and a summary of the congress conclusions.

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ; ;
  1. Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
230822
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Power Engineering Review; Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; ENERGY POLICY; GLOBAL ASPECTS; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; FINANCING; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

Citation Formats

Hammons, T.J., Kim, C.S., Jennings, J.S., Fresco, P., Nasu, S., and Baker, J. World Energy Council 16. Congress review. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.1109/MPER.1996.486946.
Hammons, T.J., Kim, C.S., Jennings, J.S., Fresco, P., Nasu, S., & Baker, J. World Energy Council 16. Congress review. United States. doi:10.1109/MPER.1996.486946.
Hammons, T.J., Kim, C.S., Jennings, J.S., Fresco, P., Nasu, S., and Baker, J. Fri . "World Energy Council 16. Congress review". United States. doi:10.1109/MPER.1996.486946.
@article{osti_230822,
title = {World Energy Council 16. Congress review},
author = {Hammons, T.J. and Kim, C.S. and Jennings, J.S. and Fresco, P. and Nasu, S. and Baker, J.},
abstractNote = {The sixteenth World Energy Council (WEC) Congress was hosted in Tokyo, Japan, October 8--13, 1995, with a theme of ``Energy for Our Common World: What will the future ask of us?`` Participants in the congress examined several fundamental issues of these times: hot to provide the energy services for an increasing world population, especially in developing countries; hot to meet local, regional, and global environmental and social concerns; how to adapt to changing markets and institutions; how to respond to diversified transportation and other end use patterns reflecting human behavior; how to deal with the emerging interdependence of energy markets; and what action to be pursued individually and collectively. This article summarizes the highlights of the congress, and includes an overview of the World Energy Council (WEC), a synopsis of the events, summaries of the technical program division addresses, and a summary of the congress conclusions.},
doi = {10.1109/MPER.1996.486946},
journal = {IEEE Power Engineering Review},
number = 3,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Fri Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}
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