skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Land-use planning scenarios for contaminated land: comparing EPA, state, and tribal scenarios - 15642

Abstract

Land-use planning focusing on future disposition of public lands, forests and, former agricultural or industrial land, must take into account demographic and economic factors as well as future needs and availability of recreational open space, arable land, and water for growing populations. Planning requires the balancing of competing interests for 'growth', open space, and preservation of cultural, ecological and natural resources Landscapes with soil, surface water, and groundwater contaminated by former military, industrial, mining or agricultural uses, pose special challenges, many of which have been addressed under the rubric of 'brown-fields'. Land-use decisions or recommendations can be based mainly on economic/social interests taking into account projected demographic changes, or they can be based mainly on environmental issues taking into account contamination levels, remediation costs and technologies, and health risk issues. Future land-use is interwoven with cleanup goals. Where unrestricted future land-use is anticipated or desired, cleanup levels for soil and groundwater must be low enough to allow such uses without unacceptable health risks. Where such cleanup levels are unattainable for fiscal or technological reasons, residual contamination will remain, and future uses, particularly for groundwater, must be restricted, requiring engineered barriers and institutional controls to interdict future exposure pathways from contaminatedmore » environmental media to receptors (residents, recreationists, employees). Although contamination and hazard may persist for centuries, planning beyond a generation or two incurs great uncertainties in demographics, policies, economic, and climate-related changes. The Environmental Protection Agency and various states have established categories of clean-up levels corresponding to future industrial, recreational and residential use, with variations on these themes. This paper examines the spectrum of land-uses, and emphasizes a distinctions between -residential- and -unrestricted- as applied to future land-uses, particularly involving groundwater. Land-use determinations can be proposed and evaluated by a myriad of regulatory policies, guidance documents, and processes, including comprehensive land-use planning documents, Baseline Risk Assessments, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility documents and Records of Decision - which are not the focus of this study. This study instead focuses on gradations in different residential, recreational and industrial land-use scenarios and their relation to contamination of soil and groundwater. The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) instituted this study to help understand the varying land-use versus clean-up decisions at the Department of Energy's environmental management sites, particularly Hanford (Washington State). (authors)« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation - CRESP (United States)
  2. Rutgers University, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation - CRESP (United States)
  3. Vanderbilt University, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation - CRESP (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
WM Symposia, Inc., PO Box 27646, 85285-7646 Tempe, AZ (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
22824485
Report Number(s):
INIS-US-19-WM-15642
TRN: US19V1057069531
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM2015: Annual Waste Management Symposium, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 15-19 Mar 2015; Other Information: Country of input: France; available online at: http://archive.wmsym.org/2015/index.html
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; FORESTS; GROUND WATER; HEALTH HAZARDS; LAND USE; MINING; PLANNING; PUBLIC LANDS; RECOMMENDATIONS; REMEDIAL ACTION; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; RISK ASSESSMENT; SOILS; US EPA

Citation Formats

Gochfeld, Michael, Burger, Joanna, Powers, Charles, and Kosson, David. Land-use planning scenarios for contaminated land: comparing EPA, state, and tribal scenarios - 15642. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Gochfeld, Michael, Burger, Joanna, Powers, Charles, & Kosson, David. Land-use planning scenarios for contaminated land: comparing EPA, state, and tribal scenarios - 15642. United States.
Gochfeld, Michael, Burger, Joanna, Powers, Charles, and Kosson, David. Wed . "Land-use planning scenarios for contaminated land: comparing EPA, state, and tribal scenarios - 15642". United States.
@article{osti_22824485,
title = {Land-use planning scenarios for contaminated land: comparing EPA, state, and tribal scenarios - 15642},
author = {Gochfeld, Michael and Burger, Joanna and Powers, Charles and Kosson, David},
abstractNote = {Land-use planning focusing on future disposition of public lands, forests and, former agricultural or industrial land, must take into account demographic and economic factors as well as future needs and availability of recreational open space, arable land, and water for growing populations. Planning requires the balancing of competing interests for 'growth', open space, and preservation of cultural, ecological and natural resources Landscapes with soil, surface water, and groundwater contaminated by former military, industrial, mining or agricultural uses, pose special challenges, many of which have been addressed under the rubric of 'brown-fields'. Land-use decisions or recommendations can be based mainly on economic/social interests taking into account projected demographic changes, or they can be based mainly on environmental issues taking into account contamination levels, remediation costs and technologies, and health risk issues. Future land-use is interwoven with cleanup goals. Where unrestricted future land-use is anticipated or desired, cleanup levels for soil and groundwater must be low enough to allow such uses without unacceptable health risks. Where such cleanup levels are unattainable for fiscal or technological reasons, residual contamination will remain, and future uses, particularly for groundwater, must be restricted, requiring engineered barriers and institutional controls to interdict future exposure pathways from contaminated environmental media to receptors (residents, recreationists, employees). Although contamination and hazard may persist for centuries, planning beyond a generation or two incurs great uncertainties in demographics, policies, economic, and climate-related changes. The Environmental Protection Agency and various states have established categories of clean-up levels corresponding to future industrial, recreational and residential use, with variations on these themes. This paper examines the spectrum of land-uses, and emphasizes a distinctions between -residential- and -unrestricted- as applied to future land-uses, particularly involving groundwater. Land-use determinations can be proposed and evaluated by a myriad of regulatory policies, guidance documents, and processes, including comprehensive land-use planning documents, Baseline Risk Assessments, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility documents and Records of Decision - which are not the focus of this study. This study instead focuses on gradations in different residential, recreational and industrial land-use scenarios and their relation to contamination of soil and groundwater. The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) instituted this study to help understand the varying land-use versus clean-up decisions at the Department of Energy's environmental management sites, particularly Hanford (Washington State). (authors)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22824485}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: