skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Review: Safe and sustainable groundwater supply in China

Abstract

Exploitation of groundwater has greatly increased since the 1970s to meet the increased water demand due to fast economic development in China. Correspondingly, the regional groundwater level has declined substantially in many areas of China. Water sources are scarce in northern and northwestern China, and the anthropogenic pollution of groundwater has worsened the situation. Groundwater containing high concentrations of geogenic arsenic, fluoride, iodine, and salinity is widely distributed across China, which has negatively affected safe supply of water for drinking and other purposes. In addition to anthropogenic contamination, the interactions between surface water and groundwater, including seawater intrusion, have caused deterioration of groundwater quality. The ecosystem and geo-environment have been severely affected by the depletion of groundwater resources. Land subsidence due to excessive groundwater withdrawal has been observed in more than 50 cities in China, with a maximum accumulated subsidence of 2–3 m. Groundwater-dependent ecosystems are being degraded due to changes in the water table or poor groundwater quality. This paper reviews these changes in China, which have occurred under the impact of rapid economic development. The effects of economic growth on groundwater systems should be monitored, understood and predicted to better protect and manage groundwater resources for the future.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. China University of Geosciences, State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology & School of Environmental Studies (China)
  2. South University of Science and Technology of China, School of Environmental Science and Engineering (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22780858
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Hydrogeology Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2018 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 1431-2174
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARSENIC; CHINA; CONCENTRATION RATIO; CONTAMINATION; ECOSYSTEMS; FLUORINE; GROUND WATER; INTERACTIONS; IODINE; POLLUTION; RESOURCE EXPLOITATION; SALINITY; SEAWATER; SURFACES; SUSTAINABILITY; URBAN AREAS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WATER TABLES

Citation Formats

Wang, Yanxin, Zheng, Chunmiao, and Ma, Rui. Review: Safe and sustainable groundwater supply in China. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1007/S10040-018-1795-1.
Wang, Yanxin, Zheng, Chunmiao, & Ma, Rui. Review: Safe and sustainable groundwater supply in China. United States. doi:10.1007/S10040-018-1795-1.
Wang, Yanxin, Zheng, Chunmiao, and Ma, Rui. Wed . "Review: Safe and sustainable groundwater supply in China". United States. doi:10.1007/S10040-018-1795-1.
@article{osti_22780858,
title = {Review: Safe and sustainable groundwater supply in China},
author = {Wang, Yanxin and Zheng, Chunmiao and Ma, Rui},
abstractNote = {Exploitation of groundwater has greatly increased since the 1970s to meet the increased water demand due to fast economic development in China. Correspondingly, the regional groundwater level has declined substantially in many areas of China. Water sources are scarce in northern and northwestern China, and the anthropogenic pollution of groundwater has worsened the situation. Groundwater containing high concentrations of geogenic arsenic, fluoride, iodine, and salinity is widely distributed across China, which has negatively affected safe supply of water for drinking and other purposes. In addition to anthropogenic contamination, the interactions between surface water and groundwater, including seawater intrusion, have caused deterioration of groundwater quality. The ecosystem and geo-environment have been severely affected by the depletion of groundwater resources. Land subsidence due to excessive groundwater withdrawal has been observed in more than 50 cities in China, with a maximum accumulated subsidence of 2–3 m. Groundwater-dependent ecosystems are being degraded due to changes in the water table or poor groundwater quality. This paper reviews these changes in China, which have occurred under the impact of rapid economic development. The effects of economic growth on groundwater systems should be monitored, understood and predicted to better protect and manage groundwater resources for the future.},
doi = {10.1007/S10040-018-1795-1},
journal = {Hydrogeology Journal},
issn = {1431-2174},
number = 5,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}