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Title: GAMMA-RAY UPPER LIMITS ON MAGNETARS WITH SIX YEARS OF FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS

Abstract

We report on the search for gamma-ray emission from 20 magnetars using six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently known magnetars is found. We derived the most stringent upper limits to date on the 0.1–10 GeV emission of Galactic magnetars, which are estimated between ∼10{sup −12} and 10{sup −11} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. We searched gamma-ray pulsations for the four magnetars having reliable ephemerides over the observing period, but detected none. We also report updated morphologies and spectral properties of seven spatially extended gamma-ray sources, which are most likely attributed to supernova remnants associated with or adjacent to the magnetars.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC–CSIC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Magrans s/n, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22664036
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; EMISSION; GAMMA RADIATION; GAMMA SOURCES; GEV RANGE 01-10; NEUTRON STARS; PULSATIONS; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; TELESCOPES; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Li, Jian, Rea, Nanda, Torres, Diego F., and De Oña-Wilhelmi, Emma. GAMMA-RAY UPPER LIMITS ON MAGNETARS WITH SIX YEARS OF FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/30.
Li, Jian, Rea, Nanda, Torres, Diego F., & De Oña-Wilhelmi, Emma. GAMMA-RAY UPPER LIMITS ON MAGNETARS WITH SIX YEARS OF FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/30.
Li, Jian, Rea, Nanda, Torres, Diego F., and De Oña-Wilhelmi, Emma. Fri . "GAMMA-RAY UPPER LIMITS ON MAGNETARS WITH SIX YEARS OF FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/30.
@article{osti_22664036,
title = {GAMMA-RAY UPPER LIMITS ON MAGNETARS WITH SIX YEARS OF FERMI -LAT OBSERVATIONS},
author = {Li, Jian and Rea, Nanda and Torres, Diego F. and De Oña-Wilhelmi, Emma},
abstractNote = {We report on the search for gamma-ray emission from 20 magnetars using six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently known magnetars is found. We derived the most stringent upper limits to date on the 0.1–10 GeV emission of Galactic magnetars, which are estimated between ∼10{sup −12} and 10{sup −11} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. We searched gamma-ray pulsations for the four magnetars having reliable ephemerides over the observing period, but detected none. We also report updated morphologies and spectral properties of seven spatially extended gamma-ray sources, which are most likely attributed to supernova remnants associated with or adjacent to the magnetars.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/1/30},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • In this article, we report on the search for gamma-ray emission from 20 magnetars using six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently known magnetars is found. We derived the most stringent upper limits to date on the 0.1–10 GeV emission of Galactic magnetars, which are estimated between ~10 -12 and 10 -11 erg s -1 cm -2. We searched gamma-ray pulsations for the four magnetars having reliable ephemerides over the observing period, but detected none. Finally, we also report updated morphologies and spectral properties of seven spatially extendedmore » gamma-ray sources, which are most likely attributed to supernova remnants associated with or adjacent to the magnetars.« less
  • We present results from γ-ray observations of the Coma cluster incorporating 6 years of Fermi-LAT data and the newly released “Pass 8” event-level analysis. Our analysis of the region reveals low-significance residual structures within the virial radius of the cluster that are too faint for a detailed investigation with the current data. Using a likelihood approach that is free of assumptions on the spectral shape we derive upper limits on the γ-ray flux that is expected from energetic particle interactions in the cluster. We also consider a benchmark spatial and spectral template motivated by models in which the observed radiomore » halo is mostly emission by secondary electrons. In this case, the median expected and observed upper limits for the flux above 100MeV are 1.7 x 10 -9 ph cm -2 s -1 and 5.2 x 10 -9 ph cm -2 s -1 respectively (the latter corresponds to residual emission at the level of 1:8σ). These bounds are comparable to or higher than predicted levels of hadronic gamma-ray emission in cosmic-ray models with or without reacceleration of secondary electrons, although direct comparisons are sensitive to assumptions regarding the origin and propagation mode of cosmic rays and magnetic field properties. The minimal expected γ-ray flux from radio and star-forming galaxies within the Coma cluster is roughly an order of magnitude below the median sensitivity of our analysis.« less
  • Here, colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are thought to give rise to a plethora of physical processes including acceleration and interaction of relativistic particles. Observation of synchrotron radiation in the radio band confirms there is a relativistic electron population in CWBs. Accordingly, CWBs have been suspected sources of high-energy γ-ray emission since the COS-B era. Theoretical models exist that characterize the underlying physical processes leading to particle acceleration and quantitatively predict the non-thermal energy emission observable at Earth. Furthermore, we strive to find evidence of γ-ray emission from a sample of seven CWB systems: WR 11, WR 70, WR 125, WRmore » 137, WR 140, WR 146, and WR 147. Theoretical modelling identified these systems as the most favourable candidates for emitting γ-rays. We make a comparison with existing γ-ray flux predictions and investigate possible constraints. We used 24 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to perform a dedicated likelihood analysis of CWBs in the LAT energy range. As a result, we find no evidence of γ-ray emission from any of the studied CWB systems and determine corresponding flux upper limits. For some CWBs the interplay of orbital and stellar parameters renders the Fermi-LAT data not sensitive enough to constrain the parameter space of the emission models. In the cases of WR140 and WR147, the Fermi -LAT upper limits appear to rule out some model predictions entirely and constrain theoretical models over a significant parameter space. A comparison of our findings to the CWB η Car is made.« less
  • Context. The nearby Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides a rare opportunity of a spatially resolved view of an external star-forming galaxy in -rays. The LMC was detected at 0.1–100 GeV as an extended source with CGRO/EGRET and using early observations with the Fermi-LAT. The emission was found to correlate with massive star-forming regions and to be particularly bright towards 30 Doradus. Aims. Studies of the origin and transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Milky Way are frequently hampered by line-of-sight confusion and poor distance determination. The LMC offers a complementary way to address these questions by revealing whether andmore » how the -ray emission is connected to specific objects, populations of objects, and structures in the galaxy. Methods. We revisited the -ray emission from the LMC using about 73 months of Fermi-LAT P7REP data in the 0.2–100 GeV range. We developed a complete spatial and spectral model of the LMC emission, for which we tested several approaches: a simple geometrical description, template-fitting, and a physically driven model for CR-induced interstellar emission. Results. In addition to identifying PSR J0540-6919 through its pulsations, we find two hard sources positionally coincident with plerion N 157B and supernova remnant N 132D, which were also detected at TeV energies with H.E.S.S. We detect an additional soft source that is currently unidentified. Extended emission dominates the total flux from the LMC. It consists of an extended component of about the size of the galaxy and additional emission from three to four regions with degree-scale sizes. If it is interpreted as CRs interacting with interstellar gas, the large-scale emission implies a large-scale population of ~1–100GeV CRs with a density of ~30% of the local Galactic value. On top of that, the three to four small-scale emission regions would correspond to enhancements of the CR density by factors 2 to 6 or higher, possibly more energetic and younger populations of CRs compared to the large-scale population. An alternative explanation is that this is emission from an unresolved population of at least two dozen objects, such as pulsars and their nebulae or supernova remnants. This small-scale extended emission has a spatial distribution that does not clearly correlate with known components of the LMC, except for a possible relation to cavities and supergiant shells. Conclusions. The Fermi-LAT GeV observations allowed us to detect individual sources in the LMC. Three of the newly discovered sources are associated with rare and extreme objects. The 30 Doradus region is prominent in GeV -rays because PSR J0540-6919 and N 157B are strong emitters. The extended emission from the galaxy has an unexpected spatial distribution, and observations at higher energies and in radio may help to clarify its origin. Key words. Gamma« less