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Title: On the Rotationally Driven Pevatron in the Center of the Milky Way

Abstract

Based on the collective linear and nonlinear processes in a magnetized plasma surrounding the black hole at the Galactic center (GC), an acceleration mechanism is proposed to explain the recent detection/discovery of PeV protons. In a two-stage process, the gravitation energy is first converted to the electrical energy in fast-growing Langmuir waves, and then the electrical energy is transformed to the particle kinetic energy through Landau damping of waves. It is shown that, for the characteristic parameters of GC plasma, proton energy can be boosted up to 5 PeV.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Physics, Free University of Tbilisi, 0183-Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)
  2. Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)
  3. Centre for Theoretical Astrophysics, ITP, Ilia State University, 0162 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22663947
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 835; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; BLACK HOLES; COSMIC RADIATION; DETECTION; GALAXY NUCLEI; GRAVITATION; KINETIC ENERGY; LANDAU DAMPING; MILKY WAY; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; PEV RANGE; PLASMA; PROTONS

Citation Formats

Osmanov, Z, Mahajan, S, and Machabeli, G. On the Rotationally Driven Pevatron in the Center of the Milky Way. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/164.
Osmanov, Z, Mahajan, S, & Machabeli, G. On the Rotationally Driven Pevatron in the Center of the Milky Way. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/164.
Osmanov, Z, Mahajan, S, and Machabeli, G. Wed . "On the Rotationally Driven Pevatron in the Center of the Milky Way". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/164.
@article{osti_22663947,
title = {On the Rotationally Driven Pevatron in the Center of the Milky Way},
author = {Osmanov, Z and Mahajan, S and Machabeli, G},
abstractNote = {Based on the collective linear and nonlinear processes in a magnetized plasma surrounding the black hole at the Galactic center (GC), an acceleration mechanism is proposed to explain the recent detection/discovery of PeV protons. In a two-stage process, the gravitation energy is first converted to the electrical energy in fast-growing Langmuir waves, and then the electrical energy is transformed to the particle kinetic energy through Landau damping of waves. It is shown that, for the characteristic parameters of GC plasma, proton energy can be boosted up to 5 PeV.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/164},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 835,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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