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Title: Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142

Abstract

In order to look for signs of ongoing planet formation in young disks, we carried out the first J -band polarized emission imaging of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142 using the Gemini Planet Imager, along with new H band observations of HD 144432. We confirm the complex “double ring” structure for the nearly face-on system HD 169142 first seen in H -band, finding the outer ring to be substantially redder than the inner one in polarized intensity. Using radiative transfer modeling, we developed a physical model that explains the full spectral energy distribution and J - and H -band surface brightness profiles, suggesting that the differential color of the two rings could come from reddened starlight traversing the inner wall and may not require differences in grain properties. In addition, we clearly detect an elongated, off-center ring in HD 163296 (MWC 275), locating the scattering surface to be 18 au above the midplane at a radial distance of 77 au, co-spatial with a ring seen at 1.3 mm by ALMA linked to the CO snow line. Lastly, we report a weak tentative detection of scattered light for HD 150193 (MWC 863) and a non-detectionmore » for HD 144432; the stellar companion known for each of these targets has likely disrupted the material in the outer disk of the primary star. For HD 163296 and HD 169142, the prominent outer rings we detect could be evidence for giant planet formation in the outer disk or a manifestation of large-scale dust growth processes possibly related to snow-line chemistry.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Astronomy Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  2. University of Exeter, Exeter (United Kingdom)
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 91023 (United States)
  4. Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)
  5. European Southern Observatory, Garching (Germany)
  6. American Museum of Natural History, New York (United States)
  7. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661256
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; BRIGHTNESS; CARBON; CARBON MONOXIDE; COLOR; DETECTION; DISTANCE; DUSTS; EMISSION; ENERGY SPECTRA; PLANETS; PROTOPLANETS; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER; SCATTERING; SIMULATION; STARS; SURFACES; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Monnier, John D., Aarnio, Alicia, Adams, Fred C., Calvet, Nuria, Hartmann, Lee, Harries, Tim J., Hinkley, Sasha, Kraus, Stefan, Andrews, Sean, Wilner, David, Espaillat, Catherine, McClure, Melissa, Oppenheimer, Rebecca, and Perrin, Marshall. Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6248.
Monnier, John D., Aarnio, Alicia, Adams, Fred C., Calvet, Nuria, Hartmann, Lee, Harries, Tim J., Hinkley, Sasha, Kraus, Stefan, Andrews, Sean, Wilner, David, Espaillat, Catherine, McClure, Melissa, Oppenheimer, Rebecca, & Perrin, Marshall. Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6248.
Monnier, John D., Aarnio, Alicia, Adams, Fred C., Calvet, Nuria, Hartmann, Lee, Harries, Tim J., Hinkley, Sasha, Kraus, Stefan, Andrews, Sean, Wilner, David, Espaillat, Catherine, McClure, Melissa, Oppenheimer, Rebecca, and Perrin, Marshall. Mon . "Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6248.
@article{osti_22661256,
title = {Polarized Disk Emission from Herbig Ae/Be Stars Observed Using Gemini Planet Imager: HD 144432, HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142},
author = {Monnier, John D. and Aarnio, Alicia and Adams, Fred C. and Calvet, Nuria and Hartmann, Lee and Harries, Tim J. and Hinkley, Sasha and Kraus, Stefan and Andrews, Sean and Wilner, David and Espaillat, Catherine and McClure, Melissa and Oppenheimer, Rebecca and Perrin, Marshall},
abstractNote = {In order to look for signs of ongoing planet formation in young disks, we carried out the first J -band polarized emission imaging of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 150193, HD 163296, and HD 169142 using the Gemini Planet Imager, along with new H band observations of HD 144432. We confirm the complex “double ring” structure for the nearly face-on system HD 169142 first seen in H -band, finding the outer ring to be substantially redder than the inner one in polarized intensity. Using radiative transfer modeling, we developed a physical model that explains the full spectral energy distribution and J - and H -band surface brightness profiles, suggesting that the differential color of the two rings could come from reddened starlight traversing the inner wall and may not require differences in grain properties. In addition, we clearly detect an elongated, off-center ring in HD 163296 (MWC 275), locating the scattering surface to be 18 au above the midplane at a radial distance of 77 au, co-spatial with a ring seen at 1.3 mm by ALMA linked to the CO snow line. Lastly, we report a weak tentative detection of scattered light for HD 150193 (MWC 863) and a non-detection for HD 144432; the stellar companion known for each of these targets has likely disrupted the material in the outer disk of the primary star. For HD 163296 and HD 169142, the prominent outer rings we detect could be evidence for giant planet formation in the outer disk or a manifestation of large-scale dust growth processes possibly related to snow-line chemistry.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA6248},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}