skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow

Abstract

We present broadband spectral energy distributions and light curves of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6−5856 measured in the X-ray and the gamma-ray bands. We find that the orbital modulation in the low-energy gamma-ray band is similar to that in the X-ray band, suggesting a common spectral component. However, above a GeV the orbital light curve changes significantly. We suggest that the GeV band contains significant flux from a pulsar magnetosphere, while the X-ray to TeV light curves are dominated by synchrotron and Compton emission from an intrabinary shock (IBS). We find that a simple one-zone model is inadequate to explain the IBS emission, but that beamed Synchrotron-self Compton radiation from adiabatically accelerated plasma in the shocked pulsar wind can reproduce the complex multiband light curves, including the variable X-ray spike coincident with the gamma-ray maximum. The model requires an inclination of ∼50° and an orbital eccentricity of ∼0.35, consistent with the limited constraints from existing optical observations. This picture motivates searches for pulsations from the energetic young pulsar powering the wind shock.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics/KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661184
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 838; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BEAMS; BINARY STARS; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; EMISSION; ENERGY SPECTRA; GAMMA RADIATION; GEV RANGE; LIMITING VALUES; MODULATION; PLASMA; PULSARS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SIMULATION; STARS; STELLAR WINDS; TEV RANGE; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

An, Hongjun, and Romani, Roger W., E-mail: hjan@chungbuk.ac.kr. Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6623.
An, Hongjun, & Romani, Roger W., E-mail: hjan@chungbuk.ac.kr. Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6623.
An, Hongjun, and Romani, Roger W., E-mail: hjan@chungbuk.ac.kr. Sat . "Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/AA6623.
@article{osti_22661184,
title = {Light Curve and SED Modeling of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856: Constraints on the Orbital Geometry and Relativistic Flow},
author = {An, Hongjun and Romani, Roger W., E-mail: hjan@chungbuk.ac.kr},
abstractNote = {We present broadband spectral energy distributions and light curves of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6−5856 measured in the X-ray and the gamma-ray bands. We find that the orbital modulation in the low-energy gamma-ray band is similar to that in the X-ray band, suggesting a common spectral component. However, above a GeV the orbital light curve changes significantly. We suggest that the GeV band contains significant flux from a pulsar magnetosphere, while the X-ray to TeV light curves are dominated by synchrotron and Compton emission from an intrabinary shock (IBS). We find that a simple one-zone model is inadequate to explain the IBS emission, but that beamed Synchrotron-self Compton radiation from adiabatically accelerated plasma in the shocked pulsar wind can reproduce the complex multiband light curves, including the variable X-ray spike coincident with the gamma-ray maximum. The model requires an inclination of ∼50° and an orbital eccentricity of ∼0.35, consistent with the limited constraints from existing optical observations. This picture motivates searches for pulsations from the energetic young pulsar powering the wind shock.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/AA6623},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 838,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • We present broadband spectral energy distributions and light curves of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856 measured in the X-ray and the gamma-ray bands. We find that the orbital modulation in the low-energy gamma-ray band is similar to that in the X-ray band, suggesting a common spectral component. However, above a GeV the orbital light curve changes significantly. We suggest that the GeV band contains significant flux from a pulsar magnetosphere, while the X-ray to TeV light curves are dominated by synchrotron and Compton emission from an intrabinary shock (IBS). We find that a simple one-zone model is inadequate to explainmore » the IBS emission, but that beamed Synchrotron-self Compton radiation from adiabatically accelerated plasma in the shocked pulsar wind can reproduce the complex multiband light curves, including the variable X-ray spike coincident with the gamma-ray maximum. Furthermore, the model requires an inclination of ~50° and an orbital eccentricity of ~0.35, consistent with the limited constraints from existing optical observations. This picture motivates searches for pulsations from the energetic young pulsar powering the wind shock.« less
  • We report on NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856. We measure the orbital period to be 16.544 ± 0.008 days using Swift data spanning 1900 days. The orbital period is different from the 2011 gamma-ray measurement which was used in the previous X-ray study of An et al. using ∼400 days of Swift data, but is consistent with a new gamma-ray solution reported in 2014. The light curve folded on the new period is qualitatively similar to that reported previously, having a spike at phase 0 and broad sinusoidal modulation. The X-ray flux enhancement atmore » phase 0 occurs more regularly in time than was previously suggested. A spiky structure at this phase seems to be a persistent feature, although there is some variability. Furthermore, we find that the source flux clearly correlates with the spectral hardness throughout all orbital phases, and that the broadband X-ray spectra measured with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift are well fit with an unbroken power-law model. This spectrum suggests that the system may not be accretion-powered.« less
  • The Fermi Large Area telescope (Fermi-LAT) collaboration has recently reported that one of their detected sources, namely, 1FGL J1018.6-5856, is a new gamma-ray binary similar to LS 5039. This has prompted efforts to study its multi-frequency behavior. In this report, we present the results from 5.78 Ms International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) IBIS/ISGRI observations on the source 1FGL J1018.6-5856. By combining all the available INTEGRAL data, a detection is made at a significance level of 5.4{sigma} in the 18-40 keV band, with an average intensity of 0.074 counts s{sup -1}. However, we find that there is non-statistical noise in themore » image that effectively reduces the significance to about 4{sigma} and a significant part of the signal appears to be located in a 0.2-wide phase region, at phases 0.4-0.6 (where even the corrected significance amounts to 90% of the total signal found). Given the scarcity of counts, a variability is hinted at about 3{sigma} at the hard X-rays, with an anticorrelation with the Fermi-LAT periodicity. If this behavior were true, it would be similar to that found in LS 5039 and prompt observations with TeV telescopes at phases anticorrelated with the GeV maximum.« less
  • Gamma-ray binaries are stellar systems containing a neutron star or black hole with gamma-ray emission produced by an interaction between the components. These systems are rare, even though binary evolution models predict dozens in our Galaxy. A search for gamma-ray binaries with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) shows that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 exhibits intensity and spectral modulation with a 16.6 day period. We identified a variable X-ray counterpart, which shows a sharp maximum coinciding with maximum gamma-ray emission, as well as an O6V((f)) star optical counterpart and a radio counterpart that is also apparently modulated on the orbital period. 1FGLmore » J1018.6-5856 is thus a gamma-ray binary, and its detection suggests the presence of other fainter binaries in the Galaxy.« less
  • Gamma-ray binaries are a small subclass of the high mass X-ray binary population that exhibit emission across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. We present the radial velocities of 1FGL J1018.6−5856 based on the observations obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope. We combine our measurements with those published in the literature to get a broad phase coverage. The mass function obtained supports a neutron star compact object, although a black hole mass is possible for the very low inclination angles. The improved phase coverage allows constraints to be placed on the orbital eccentricity ( e = 0.31 ± 0.16), which agreesmore » with the estimates from the high-energy data.« less