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Title: Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration

Abstract

The common envelope (CE) binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The CE interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers, and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. CE simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based CE simulations to produce the light curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from CE hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in unigrid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is testedmore » using the first 135 days of the CE simulation of Passy et al., where a 0.8  M {sub ⊙} red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6  M {sub ⊙} companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as CE interactions.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  2. Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661165
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series; Journal Volume: 229; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; APPROXIMATIONS; BINARY STARS; CALIBRATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DATA ANALYSIS; DIAGRAMS; GRIDS; HYDRODYNAMICS; LUMINOSITY; MASS TRANSFER; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; RED GIANT STARS; TRANSIENTS; VALIDATION; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Galaviz, Pablo, Marco, Orsola De, Staff, Jan E., Iaconi, Roberto, and Passy, Jean-Claude, E-mail: Pablo.Galaviz@me.com. Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA64E1.
Galaviz, Pablo, Marco, Orsola De, Staff, Jan E., Iaconi, Roberto, & Passy, Jean-Claude, E-mail: Pablo.Galaviz@me.com. Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA64E1.
Galaviz, Pablo, Marco, Orsola De, Staff, Jan E., Iaconi, Roberto, and Passy, Jean-Claude, E-mail: Pablo.Galaviz@me.com. Sat . "Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA64E1.
@article{osti_22661165,
title = {Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration},
author = {Galaviz, Pablo and Marco, Orsola De and Staff, Jan E. and Iaconi, Roberto and Passy, Jean-Claude, E-mail: Pablo.Galaviz@me.com},
abstractNote = {The common envelope (CE) binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The CE interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers, and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. CE simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based CE simulations to produce the light curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from CE hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in unigrid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is tested using the first 135 days of the CE simulation of Passy et al., where a 0.8  M {sub ⊙} red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6  M {sub ⊙} companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as CE interactions.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4365/AA64E1},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series},
number = 2,
volume = 229,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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