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Title: An Empirical Template Library of Stellar Spectra for a Wide Range of Spectral Classes, Luminosity Classes, and Metallicities Using SDSS BOSS Spectra

Abstract

We present a library of empirical stellar spectra created using spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The templates cover spectral types O5 through L3, are binned by metallicity from −2.0 dex through +1.0 dex, and are separated into main-sequence (dwarf) stars and giant stars. With recently developed M dwarf metallicity indicators, we are able to extend the metallicity bins down through the spectral subtype M8, making this the first empirical library with this degree of temperature and metallicity coverage. The wavelength coverage for the templates is from 3650 to 10200 Å at a resolution of better than R  ∼ 2000. Using the templates, we identify trends in color space with metallicity and surface gravity, which will be useful for analyzing large data sets from upcoming missions like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Along with the templates, we are releasing a code for automatically (and/or visually) identifying the spectral type and metallicity of a star.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Boston University Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)
  2. Rider University, 2083 Lawrenceville Rd., Lawrence Township, NJ 08648 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22661120
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series; Journal Volume: 230; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BARYONS; CATALOGS; COLOR; DWARF STARS; GIANT STARS; GRAVITATION; INDICATORS; LUMINOSITY; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; METALLICITY; OSCILLATIONS; RESOLUTION; SPACE; TELESCOPES; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Kesseli, Aurora Y., West, Andrew A., Veyette, Mark, Harrison, Brandon, Feldman, Dan, and Bochanski, John J., E-mail: aurorak@bu.edu. An Empirical Template Library of Stellar Spectra for a Wide Range of Spectral Classes, Luminosity Classes, and Metallicities Using SDSS BOSS Spectra. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA656D.
Kesseli, Aurora Y., West, Andrew A., Veyette, Mark, Harrison, Brandon, Feldman, Dan, & Bochanski, John J., E-mail: aurorak@bu.edu. An Empirical Template Library of Stellar Spectra for a Wide Range of Spectral Classes, Luminosity Classes, and Metallicities Using SDSS BOSS Spectra. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA656D.
Kesseli, Aurora Y., West, Andrew A., Veyette, Mark, Harrison, Brandon, Feldman, Dan, and Bochanski, John J., E-mail: aurorak@bu.edu. Thu . "An Empirical Template Library of Stellar Spectra for a Wide Range of Spectral Classes, Luminosity Classes, and Metallicities Using SDSS BOSS Spectra". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/AA656D.
@article{osti_22661120,
title = {An Empirical Template Library of Stellar Spectra for a Wide Range of Spectral Classes, Luminosity Classes, and Metallicities Using SDSS BOSS Spectra},
author = {Kesseli, Aurora Y. and West, Andrew A. and Veyette, Mark and Harrison, Brandon and Feldman, Dan and Bochanski, John J., E-mail: aurorak@bu.edu},
abstractNote = {We present a library of empirical stellar spectra created using spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. The templates cover spectral types O5 through L3, are binned by metallicity from −2.0 dex through +1.0 dex, and are separated into main-sequence (dwarf) stars and giant stars. With recently developed M dwarf metallicity indicators, we are able to extend the metallicity bins down through the spectral subtype M8, making this the first empirical library with this degree of temperature and metallicity coverage. The wavelength coverage for the templates is from 3650 to 10200 Å at a resolution of better than R  ∼ 2000. Using the templates, we identify trends in color space with metallicity and surface gravity, which will be useful for analyzing large data sets from upcoming missions like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Along with the templates, we are releasing a code for automatically (and/or visually) identifying the spectral type and metallicity of a star.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4365/AA656D},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series},
number = 2,
volume = 230,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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