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Title: The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

Abstract

Following merger, a neutron star (NS) binary can produce roughly one of three different outcomes: (1) a stable NS, (2) a black hole (BH), or (3) a supramassive, rotationally supported NS, which then collapses to a BH following angular momentum losses. Which of these fates occur and in what proportion has important implications for the electromagnetic transient associated with the mergers and the expected gravitational wave (GW) signatures, which in turn depend on the high density equation of state (EOS). Here we combine relativistic calculations of NS masses using realistic EOSs with Monte Carlo population synthesis based on the mass distribution of NS binaries in our Galaxy to predict the distribution of fates expected. For many EOSs, a significant fraction of the remnants are NSs or supramassive NSs. This lends support to scenarios in which a quickly spinning, highly magnetized NS may be powering an electromagnetic transient. This also indicates that it will be important for future GW observatories to focus on high frequencies to study the post-merger GW emission. Even in cases where individual GW events are too low in signal to noise to study the post merger signature in detail, the statistics of how many mergers produce NSsmore » versus BHs can be compared with our work to constrain the EOS. To match short gamma-ray-burst (SGRB) X-ray afterglow statistics, we find that the stiffest EOSs are ruled out. Furthermore, many popular EOSs require a significant fraction of ∼60%–70% of SGRBs to be from NS–BH mergers rather than just binary NSs.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)
  2. Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654424
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 844; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; AFTERGLOW; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; BINARY ALLOY SYSTEMS; BLACK HOLES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; DENSITY; EMISSION; EQUATIONS OF STATE; GALAXIES; GAMMA RADIATION; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; MASS; MASS DISTRIBUTION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEUTRON STARS; RELATIVISTIC RANGE; SYNTHESIS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Piro, Anthony L., Giacomazzo, Bruno, and Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu. The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA7F2F.
Piro, Anthony L., Giacomazzo, Bruno, & Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu. The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA7F2F.
Piro, Anthony L., Giacomazzo, Bruno, and Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu. Tue . "The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA7F2F.
@article{osti_22654424,
title = {The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers},
author = {Piro, Anthony L. and Giacomazzo, Bruno and Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu},
abstractNote = {Following merger, a neutron star (NS) binary can produce roughly one of three different outcomes: (1) a stable NS, (2) a black hole (BH), or (3) a supramassive, rotationally supported NS, which then collapses to a BH following angular momentum losses. Which of these fates occur and in what proportion has important implications for the electromagnetic transient associated with the mergers and the expected gravitational wave (GW) signatures, which in turn depend on the high density equation of state (EOS). Here we combine relativistic calculations of NS masses using realistic EOSs with Monte Carlo population synthesis based on the mass distribution of NS binaries in our Galaxy to predict the distribution of fates expected. For many EOSs, a significant fraction of the remnants are NSs or supramassive NSs. This lends support to scenarios in which a quickly spinning, highly magnetized NS may be powering an electromagnetic transient. This also indicates that it will be important for future GW observatories to focus on high frequencies to study the post-merger GW emission. Even in cases where individual GW events are too low in signal to noise to study the post merger signature in detail, the statistics of how many mergers produce NSs versus BHs can be compared with our work to constrain the EOS. To match short gamma-ray-burst (SGRB) X-ray afterglow statistics, we find that the stiffest EOSs are ruled out. Furthermore, many popular EOSs require a significant fraction of ∼60%–70% of SGRBs to be from NS–BH mergers rather than just binary NSs.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA7F2F},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 844,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}