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Title: Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission

Abstract

Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]; ;  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)
  2. INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy)
  3. Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  4. INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy)
  5. Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)
  6. CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Parkes Observatory, P.O. Box 276, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)
  7. National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22654353
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal Letters; Journal Volume: 849; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ACCELERATION; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; COSMIC X-RAY BURSTS; EMISSION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; NEUTRON STARS; PLASMA; PULSARS; RADIO TELESCOPES; ROTATION; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Archibald, R. F., Lyutikov, M., Kaspi, V. M., Tendulkar, S. P., Burgay, M., Possenti, A., Esposito, P., Rea, N., Israel, G., Kerr, M., Sarkissian, J., and Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA9371.
Archibald, R. F., Lyutikov, M., Kaspi, V. M., Tendulkar, S. P., Burgay, M., Possenti, A., Esposito, P., Rea, N., Israel, G., Kerr, M., Sarkissian, J., & Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission. United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA9371.
Archibald, R. F., Lyutikov, M., Kaspi, V. M., Tendulkar, S. P., Burgay, M., Possenti, A., Esposito, P., Rea, N., Israel, G., Kerr, M., Sarkissian, J., and Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca. 2017. "Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission". United States. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/AA9371.
@article{osti_22654353,
title = {Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission},
author = {Archibald, R. F. and Lyutikov, M. and Kaspi, V. M. and Tendulkar, S. P. and Burgay, M. and Possenti, A. and Esposito, P. and Rea, N. and Israel, G. and Kerr, M. and Sarkissian, J. and Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca},
abstractNote = {Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.},
doi = {10.3847/2041-8213/AA9371},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 849,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
  • Two energetic hard X-ray bursts from the rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119−6127 recently triggered the Fermi and Swift space observatories. We have performed in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of these two events. Our extensive searches in both observatories’ data for lower luminosity bursts uncovered 10 additional events from the source. We report here on the timing and energetics of the 12 bursts from PSR J1119−6127 during its burst active phase on 2016 July 26 and 28. We also found a spectral softer X-ray flux enhancement in a post-burst episode, which shows evidence of cooling. Here we discuss the implications of thesemore » results on the nature of this unusual high-field radio pulsar, which firmly place it within the typical magnetar population.« less
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  • We present radio continuum light curves of the magnetar SGR J1745−2900 and Sgr A* obtained with multi-frequency, multi-epoch Very Large Array observations between 2012 and 2014. During this period, a powerful X-ray outburst from SGR J1745−2900 occurred on 2013 April 24. Enhanced radio emission is delayed with respect to the X-ray peak by about seven months. In addition, the flux density of the emission from the magnetar fluctuates by a factor of 2–4 at frequencies between 21 and 41 GHz and its spectral index varies erratically. Here, we argue that the excess fluctuating emission from the magnetar arises from themore » interaction of a shock generated from the X-ray outburst with the orbiting ionized gas at the Galactic center. In this picture, variable synchrotron emission is produced by ram pressure variations due to inhomogeneities in the dense ionized medium of the Sgr A West bar. The pulsar with its high transverse velocity is moving through a highly blueshifted ionized medium. This implies that the magnetar is at a projected distance of ∼0.1 pc from Sgr A* and that the orbiting ionized gas is partially or largely responsible for a large rotation measure detected toward the magnetar. Despite the variability of Sgr A* expected to be induced by the passage of the G2 cloud, monitoring data show a constant flux density and spectral index during this period.« less
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  • Our high-time-resolution observations reveal that individual main pulses from the Crab pulsar contain one or more short-lived microbursts. Both the energy and duration of bursts measured above 1 GHz can vary dramatically in less than a millisecond. These fluctuations are too rapid to be caused by propagation through turbulence in the Crab Nebula or in the interstellar medium; they must be intrinsic to the radio emission process in the pulsar. The mean duration of a burst varies with frequency as {nu}{sup -2}, significantly different from the broadening caused by interstellar scattering. We compare the properties of the bursts to somemore » simple models of microstructure in the radio emission region.« less