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Title: MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP3-01: Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate and Temperature Increase Induced by Artificial Medical Implants During MRI Scan

Abstract

Purpose: Heating of patients or burning of biological tissues around medical implants by RF power during MRI scan is a significant patient safety concern. The purpose of this study is to not only measure SAR values, but also RF-induced temperature elevation due to artificial hip joints during MRI scans. Methods: SAR measurement experiment was performed on three discrete manufacturers at 1.5 and 3T. Three MRI RF sequences (T1w TSE, T2w inversion recovery, and T2w TSE) with imaging parameters were selected. A gelled saline phantom mimicking human body tissue was made (Fig.1). FDTD method was utilized to calculate the SAR distribution using Sim4Life software. Based on the results of the simulation, 4 electrical field (E-field) sensors were located around two artificial hip joints inside the phantom. 56 Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensors (28 sensors on each artificial hip joint) were located on both left and right artificial hip joints to measure temperature change during MRI scan (Fig.1). Both E-field and FBG temperature sensors were calibrated with traceability at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). Results: Simulation shows that high SAR values occur in the head and tail of the implanted artificial hip joints (Fig.1 lower right). 3T MRImore » scanner shows that the local averaged-SAR values measured by probe 1, 2, and 3 are 2.30, 2.77, and 1.68 W/kg, compared to MRI scanner-reported whole body SAR value (≤1.5 W/kg) for T1w TSE and T2w-IR (Table 1). The maximum temperature elevation measured by FBG sensors is 1.49°C at 1.5 T, 2.0°C at 3 T, and 2.56°C at 3 T for T1w TSE, respectively (Table 2). Conclusion: It is essential to assess the safety of MRI system for patient with medical implant by measuring not only accurate SAR deposited in the body, but also temperature elevation due to the deposited SAR during clinical MRI.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22653912
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BONE JOINTS; COMPUTER CODES; ELECTRIC FIELDS; IMPLANTS; JOINTS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SENSORS

Citation Formats

Seo, Y. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP3-01: Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate and Temperature Increase Induced by Artificial Medical Implants During MRI Scan. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957371.
Seo, Y. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP3-01: Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate and Temperature Increase Induced by Artificial Medical Implants During MRI Scan. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957371.
Seo, Y. 2016. "MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP3-01: Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate and Temperature Increase Induced by Artificial Medical Implants During MRI Scan". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957371.
@article{osti_22653912,
title = {MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP3-01: Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate and Temperature Increase Induced by Artificial Medical Implants During MRI Scan},
author = {Seo, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Heating of patients or burning of biological tissues around medical implants by RF power during MRI scan is a significant patient safety concern. The purpose of this study is to not only measure SAR values, but also RF-induced temperature elevation due to artificial hip joints during MRI scans. Methods: SAR measurement experiment was performed on three discrete manufacturers at 1.5 and 3T. Three MRI RF sequences (T1w TSE, T2w inversion recovery, and T2w TSE) with imaging parameters were selected. A gelled saline phantom mimicking human body tissue was made (Fig.1). FDTD method was utilized to calculate the SAR distribution using Sim4Life software. Based on the results of the simulation, 4 electrical field (E-field) sensors were located around two artificial hip joints inside the phantom. 56 Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensors (28 sensors on each artificial hip joint) were located on both left and right artificial hip joints to measure temperature change during MRI scan (Fig.1). Both E-field and FBG temperature sensors were calibrated with traceability at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). Results: Simulation shows that high SAR values occur in the head and tail of the implanted artificial hip joints (Fig.1 lower right). 3T MRI scanner shows that the local averaged-SAR values measured by probe 1, 2, and 3 are 2.30, 2.77, and 1.68 W/kg, compared to MRI scanner-reported whole body SAR value (≤1.5 W/kg) for T1w TSE and T2w-IR (Table 1). The maximum temperature elevation measured by FBG sensors is 1.49°C at 1.5 T, 2.0°C at 3 T, and 2.56°C at 3 T for T1w TSE, respectively (Table 2). Conclusion: It is essential to assess the safety of MRI system for patient with medical implant by measuring not only accurate SAR deposited in the body, but also temperature elevation due to the deposited SAR during clinical MRI.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957371},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system allows acquisition of raw radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound data prior and during radiotherapy. This enables the computation of 3D Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) tissue parametric maps from. We aim to evaluate whether QUS parameters undergo changes with radiotherapy and thus potentially be used as early predictors and/or markers of treatment response in prostate cancer patients. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. QUS spectroscopy analysis was carried out by computing a tissue power spectrummore » normalized to the power spectrum obtained from a quartz to remove system transfer function effects. A ROI was selected within the 3D image volume of the prostate. Because longitudinal registration was optimal, the same features could be used to select ROIs at roughly the same location in images acquired on different days. Parametric maps were generated within the rectangular ROIs with window sizes that were approximately 8 times the wavelength of the ultrasound. The mid-band fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS) and spectral intercept (SI) QUS parameters were computed for each window within the ROI and displayed as parametric maps. Quantitative parameters were obtained by averaging each of the spectral parameters over the whole ROI. Results: Data was acquired for over 21 treatment fractions. Preliminary results show changes in the parametric maps. MBF values decreased from −33.9 dB to −38.7 dB from pre-treatment to the last day of treatment. The spectral slope increased from −1.1 a.u. to −0.5 a.u., and spectral intercept decreased from −28.2 dB to −36.3 dB over the 21 treatment regimen. Conclusion: QUS parametric maps change over the course of treatment which warrants further investigation in their potential use for treatment planning and predicting treatment outcomes. Research was supported by Elekta.« less
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