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Title: SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts

Abstract

Purpose: The focus of this work is to perform Monte Carlo-based dosimetry for several pediatric cancer xenografts in mice treated with a novel radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-CLR1404. Methods: Four mice for each tumor cell line were injected with 8–13 µCi/g of the {sup 124}124I-CLR1404. PET/CT images of each individual mouse were acquired at 5–6 time points over the span of 96–170 hours post-injection. Following acquisition, the images were co-registered, resampled, rescaled, corrected for partial volume effects (PVE), and masked. For this work the pre-treatment PET images of {sup 124}I-CLR1404 were used to predict therapeutic doses from {sup 131}I-CLR1404 at each time point by assuming the same injection activity and accounting for the difference in physical decay rates. Tumors and normal tissues were manually contoured using anatomical and functional images. The CT and the PET images were used in the Geant4 (v9.6) Monte Carlo simulation to define the geometry and source distribution, respectively. The total cumulated absorbed dose was calculated by numerically integrating the dose-rate at each time point over all time on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Results: Spatial distributions of the absorbed dose rates and dose volume histograms as well as mean, minimum, maximum, and total dose values for each ROI weremore » generated for each time point. Conclusion: This work demonstrates how mouse-specific MC-based dosimetry could potentially provide more accurate characterization of efficacy of novel radiopharmaceuticals in radionuclide therapy. This work is partially funded by NIH grant CA198392.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649429
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOSE RATES; DOSIMETRY; IMAGES; MICE; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEOPLASMS; PEDIATRICS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; RADIOTHERAPY; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; TUMOR CELLS

Citation Formats

Marsh, I, Otto, M, Weichert, J, Baiu, D, and Bednarz, B. SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957088.
Marsh, I, Otto, M, Weichert, J, Baiu, D, & Bednarz, B. SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957088.
Marsh, I, Otto, M, Weichert, J, Baiu, D, and Bednarz, B. Wed . "SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957088.
@article{osti_22649429,
title = {SU-G-TeP3-08: Pre-Clinical Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry in Several Pediatric Cancer Xenografts},
author = {Marsh, I and Otto, M and Weichert, J and Baiu, D and Bednarz, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The focus of this work is to perform Monte Carlo-based dosimetry for several pediatric cancer xenografts in mice treated with a novel radiopharmaceutical {sup 131}I-CLR1404. Methods: Four mice for each tumor cell line were injected with 8–13 µCi/g of the {sup 124}124I-CLR1404. PET/CT images of each individual mouse were acquired at 5–6 time points over the span of 96–170 hours post-injection. Following acquisition, the images were co-registered, resampled, rescaled, corrected for partial volume effects (PVE), and masked. For this work the pre-treatment PET images of {sup 124}I-CLR1404 were used to predict therapeutic doses from {sup 131}I-CLR1404 at each time point by assuming the same injection activity and accounting for the difference in physical decay rates. Tumors and normal tissues were manually contoured using anatomical and functional images. The CT and the PET images were used in the Geant4 (v9.6) Monte Carlo simulation to define the geometry and source distribution, respectively. The total cumulated absorbed dose was calculated by numerically integrating the dose-rate at each time point over all time on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Results: Spatial distributions of the absorbed dose rates and dose volume histograms as well as mean, minimum, maximum, and total dose values for each ROI were generated for each time point. Conclusion: This work demonstrates how mouse-specific MC-based dosimetry could potentially provide more accurate characterization of efficacy of novel radiopharmaceuticals in radionuclide therapy. This work is partially funded by NIH grant CA198392.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957088},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Synthetic-CTs(synCTs) are essential for MR-only treatment planning. However, the performance of synCT for IGRT must be carefully assessed. This work evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated DRRs and determined their performance for IGRT in brain cancer radiation therapy. Methods: MR-SIM and CT-SIM images were acquired of a novel anthropomorphic phantom and a cohort of 12 patients. SynCTs were generated by combining an ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence with other MRI datasets using voxel-based weighted summation. For the phantom, DRRs from synCT and CT were compared via bounding box and landmark analysis. Planar (MV/KV) and volumetric (CBCT) IGRT performancemore » were evaluated across several platforms. In patients, retrospective analysis was conducted to register CBCTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system using whole brain and local registration techniques. A semi-automatic registration program was developed and validated to rigidly register planar MV/KV images (n=37) to synCT and CT DRRs. Registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized using the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1mm of CT DRRs. Absolute 2D/2D registration shift differences ranged from 0.0–0.7mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and 0.0–0.4mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, mean shift differences were 0.4±0.5mm (range: −0.6–1.6mm), 0.0±0.5mm, (range: −0.9–1.2mm), and 0.1±0.3mm (range: −0.7–0.6mm) for the superior-inferior(S-I), left-right(L–R), and anterior-posterior(A-P) axes, respectively. Mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6±0.4mm (range: −0.2–1.6mm), 0.2±0.4mm (range: −0.3–1.2mm), and 0.2±0.3mm (range: −0.2–1.2mm) for S-I, L–R, and A–P axes, respectively. CT-SIM and synCT derived margins were within 0.3mm. Conclusion: DRRs generated via synCT agreed well with CT-SIM. Planar and volumetric registrations to synCT-derived targets were comparable to CT. This validation is the next step toward clinical implementation of MR-only planning for the brain. The submitting institution has research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.« less
  • Purpose: Gold nanoparticle (GNP) is a promising radiosensitizer that selectively boosts tumor dose in radiotherapy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging observations recently revealed for the first time that GNP exists in vivo in the form of highly localized vesicles, instead of hypothetical uniform distribution. This work investigates the corresponding difference of energy deposition in proton therapy. Methods: First, single vesicles of various radii were constructed by packing GNPs (as Φ50 nm gold spheres) in spheres and were simulated, as well as a single GNP. The radial energy depositions (REDs) were scored using 100 concentric spherical shells from 0.1µm to 10µm,more » 0.1µm thickness each, for both vesicles and GNP, and compared. TEM images, 8 days after injection in a PC3 prostate cancer murine model, were used to extract position/dimension of vesicles, as well as contours of cytoplasmic and nucleus membranes. Vesicles were then constructed based on the TEM images. A 100 MeV proton beam was studied by using the Geant4-DNA code, which simulates all energy deposition events. Results: The vesicle REDs, normalized to the same proton energy loss as in a single GNP, are larger (smaller) than that of a single GNP when radius >2µm (<2µm). The peak increase (at about 3µm radius) is about 10% and 18% for Φ1µm and Φ1.6µm vesicles respectively, relative to a single GNP. The TEM-based simulation resulted in a larger energy deposition (by about one order of magnitude) that follows completely different pattern from that of hypothetical GNP distributions (regular dotted pattern in extracellular and/or extranucleus regions). Conclusion: The in vivo energy deposition, both in pattern and magnitude, of proton therapy is greatly affected by the true distribution of the GNP, as illustrated by the presence of GNP vesicles compared to hypothetical scenarios. Work supported by NSERC Discovery Grant #435510, Canada.« less
  • Purpose: The dose tolerances of normal tissues continue being the main limitation in radiotherapy. To overcome it, we recently proposed a novel concept: proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT) [1]. It allies the physical advantages of protons with the normal tissue preservation observed when irradiated with submillimetric spatially fractionated beams (minibeam radiation therapy) [2]. The dose distributions are such that the tumor receives a homogeneous dose distribution, while normal tissues benefit from the spatial fractionation of the dose. The objective of our work was to implement this promising technique at a clinical center (Proton therapy center in Orsay) in order tomore » evaluate the potential gain in tissue sparing. Methods: Dose distributions were measured by means of gafchromic films and a PTW microdiamond detector (60019). Once the dosimetry was established, the whole brain of 7 weeks old male Fischer 344 rats was irradiated. Half of the animals received conventional seamless proton irradiation (25 Gy in one fraction). The other rats were irradiated with pMBRT (58 Gy peak dose in one fraction). The average dose deposited in the same targeted volume was in both cases 25 Gy. Results: The first complete set of dosimetric data in such small proton field sizes was obtained [3]. Rats treated with conventional proton irradiation exhibited severe moist desquamation and permanent epilation afterwards. The minibeam group, on the other hand, exhibited no skin damage and no clinical symptoms. MRI imaging and histological analysis are planned at 6 months after irradiation. Conclusion: Our preliminary results indicate that pMBRT leads to an increase in tissue resistance. This can open the door to an efficient treatment of very radioresistant tumours. [1] Prezado et al. Med. Phys. 40, 031712, 1–8 (2013).[2] Prezado et al., Rad. Research. 184, 314-21 (2015). [3] Peucelle et al., Med. Phys. 42 7108-13 (2015).« less
  • Purpose: To examine how much lifetime attributable risk (LAR) as an in silico surrogate marker of radiation-induced secondary cancer would be lowered by using proton beam therapy (PBT) in place of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) in pediatric patients. Methods: From 242 pediatric patients with cancers who were treated with PBT, 26 patients were selected by random sampling after stratification into four categories: a) brain, head, and neck, b) thoracic, c) abdominal, and d) whole craniospinal (WCNS) irradiation. IMXT was re-planned using the same computed tomography and region of interest. Using dose volume histogram (DVH) of PBT and IMXT, themore » LAR of Schneider et al. was calculated for the same patient. The published four dose-response models for carcinoma induction: i) full model, ii) bell-shaped model, iii) plateau model, and ix) linear model were tested for organs at risk. In the case that more than one dose-response model was available, the LAR for this patient was calculated by averaging LAR for each dose-response model. Results: Calculation of the LARs of PBT and IMXT based on DVH was feasible for all patients. The mean±standard deviation of the cumulative LAR difference between PBT and IMXT for the four categories was a) 0.77±0.44% (n=7, p=0.0037), b) 23.1±17.2%,(n=8, p=0.0067), c) 16.4±19.8% (n=8, p=0.0525), and d) 49.9±21.2% (n=3, p=0.0275, one tailed t-test), respectively. The LAR was significantly lower by PBT than IMXT for the the brain, head, and neck region, thoracic region, and whole craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: In pediatric patients who had undergone PBT, the LAR of PBT was significantly lower than the LAR of IMXT estimated by in silico modeling. This method was suggested to be useful as an in silico surrogate marker of secondary cancer induced by different radiotherapy techniques. This research was supported by the Translational Research Network Program, JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15H04768 and the Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, founded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan.« less
  • Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan wasmore » optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies incorporating extended follow-up, objective outcome measures, and quality-of-life analyses.« less