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Title: SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of interstitial catheter reconstruction with 0.35T MRI images for MRI-based HDR prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Recently, a real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy system combining a 0.35T MRI system and three cobalt 60 heads (MRIdian System, ViewRay, Cleveland, OH, USA) was installed in our department. A TrueFISP sequence for MRI acquisition at lower field on Viewray was chosen due to its fast speed and high signal-to-noise efficiency. Interstitial FlexiGuide needles were implanted into a tissue equivalent ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, Virginia, USA). After an initial 15s pilot MRI to confirm the location of the phantom, planning MRI was acquired with a 172s TrueFISP sequence. The pulse sequence parameters included: flip angle = 60 degree, echo time (TE) =1.45 ms, repetition time (TR) = 3.37 ms, slice thickness = 1.5 mm, field of view (FOV) =500 × 450mm. For a reference image, a CT scan was followed. The CT and MR scans were then fused with the MIM Maestro (MIM software Inc., Cleveland, OH, USA) and sent to the Oncentra Brachy planning system (Elekta, Veenendaal, Netherlands). Automatic catheter reconstruction using CT and MR image intensities followed by manual reconstruction was used to digitize catheters. The accuracy of catheter reconstructionmore » was evaluated from the catheter tip location. Results: The average difference between the catheter tip locations reconstructed from the CT and MR in the transverse, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.1 ± 0.1 mm (left), 0.2 ± 0.2 mm (anterior), and −2.3 ± 0.5 mm (cranio). The average distance in 3D was 2.3 mm ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: This feasibility study proved that interstitial catheters can be reconstructed with 0.35T MRI images. For more accurate catheter reconstruction which can affect final dose distribution, a systematic shift should be applied to the MR based catheter reconstruction in HDR prostate brachytherapy.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649380
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BRACHYTHERAPY; COBALT 60; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; IMAGES; INTERSTITIALS; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS

Citation Formats

Park, S, Kamrava, M, and Yang, Y. SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4957034.
Park, S, Kamrava, M, & Yang, Y. SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957034.
Park, S, Kamrava, M, and Yang, Y. 2016. "SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4957034.
@article{osti_22649380,
title = {SU-G-JeP2-14: MRI-Based HDR Prostate Brachytherapy: A Phantom Study for Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction with 0.35T MRI Images},
author = {Park, S and Kamrava, M and Yang, Y},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of interstitial catheter reconstruction with 0.35T MRI images for MRI-based HDR prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Recently, a real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy system combining a 0.35T MRI system and three cobalt 60 heads (MRIdian System, ViewRay, Cleveland, OH, USA) was installed in our department. A TrueFISP sequence for MRI acquisition at lower field on Viewray was chosen due to its fast speed and high signal-to-noise efficiency. Interstitial FlexiGuide needles were implanted into a tissue equivalent ultrasound prostate phantom (CIRS, Norfolk, Virginia, USA). After an initial 15s pilot MRI to confirm the location of the phantom, planning MRI was acquired with a 172s TrueFISP sequence. The pulse sequence parameters included: flip angle = 60 degree, echo time (TE) =1.45 ms, repetition time (TR) = 3.37 ms, slice thickness = 1.5 mm, field of view (FOV) =500 × 450mm. For a reference image, a CT scan was followed. The CT and MR scans were then fused with the MIM Maestro (MIM software Inc., Cleveland, OH, USA) and sent to the Oncentra Brachy planning system (Elekta, Veenendaal, Netherlands). Automatic catheter reconstruction using CT and MR image intensities followed by manual reconstruction was used to digitize catheters. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction was evaluated from the catheter tip location. Results: The average difference between the catheter tip locations reconstructed from the CT and MR in the transverse, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.1 ± 0.1 mm (left), 0.2 ± 0.2 mm (anterior), and −2.3 ± 0.5 mm (cranio). The average distance in 3D was 2.3 mm ± 0.5 mm. Conclusion: This feasibility study proved that interstitial catheters can be reconstructed with 0.35T MRI images. For more accurate catheter reconstruction which can affect final dose distribution, a systematic shift should be applied to the MR based catheter reconstruction in HDR prostate brachytherapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4957034},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: In order to increase the accuracy and speed of catheter reconstruction in a high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implant procedure, an automatic tracking system has been developed using an electromagnetic (EM) device (trakSTAR, Ascension Technology, VT). The performance of the system, including the accuracy and noise level with various tracking parameters and conditions, were investigated. Methods: A direct current (dc) EM transmitter (midrange model) and a sensor with diameter of 1.3 mm (Model 130) were used in the trakSTAR system for tracking catheter position during HDR prostate brachytherapy. Localization accuracy was assessed under both static and dynamic analyses conditions. For themore » static analysis, a calibration phantom was used to investigate error dependency on operating room (OR) table height (bottom vs midposition vs top), sensor position (distal tip of catheter vs connector end of catheter), direction [left-right (LR) vs anterior-posterior (AP) vs superior-inferior (SI)], sampling frequency (40 vs 80 vs 120 Hz), and interference from OR equipment (present vs absent). The mean and standard deviation of the localization offset in each direction and the corresponding error vectors were calculated. For dynamic analysis, the paths of five straight catheters were tracked to study the effects of directions, sampling frequency, and interference of EM field. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the results in different configurations. Results: When interference was present in the static analysis, the error vectors were significantly higher at the top table position (3.3 {+-} 1.3 vs 1.8 {+-} 0.9 mm at bottom and 1.7 {+-} 1.0 mm at middle, p < 0.001), at catheter end position (3.1 {+-} 1.1 vs 1.4 {+-} 0.7 mm at the tip position, p < 0.001), and at 40 Hz sampling frequency (2.6 {+-} 1.1 vs 2.4 {+-} 1.5 mm at 80 Hz and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 at 160 Hz, p < 0.001). So did the mean offset errors in the LR direction (-1.7 {+-} 1.4 vs 0.4 {+-} 0.5 mm in AP and 0.8 {+-} 0.8 mm in SI directions, p < 0.001). The error vectors were significantly higher with surrounding interference (2.2 {+-} 1.3 mm) vs without interference (1.0 {+-} 0.7 mm, p < 0.001). An accuracy of 1.6 {+-} 0.2 mm can be reached when using optimum configuration (160 Hz at middle table position). When interference was present in the dynamic tracking, the mean tracking errors in LR direction (1.4 {+-} 0.5 mm) was significantly higher than that in AP direction (0.3 {+-} 0.2 mm, p < 0.001). So did the mean vector errors at 40 Hz (2.1 {+-} 0.2 mm vs 1.3 {+-} 0.2 mm at 80 Hz and 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm at 160 Hz, p < 0.05). However, when interference was absent, they were comparable in the both directions and at all sampling frequencies. An accuracy of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm was obtained for the dynamic tracking when using optimum configuration. Conclusions: The performance of an EM tracking system depends highly on the system configuration and surrounding environment. The accuracy of EM tracking for catheter reconstruction in a prostate HDR brachytherapy procedure can be improved by reducing interference from surrounding equipment, decreasing distance from transmitter to tracking area, and choosing appropriated sampling frequency. A calibration scheme is needed to further reduce the tracking error when the interference is high.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the Medical Event (ME) criteria for I-125 prostate implants based on the assessment of post implant dosimetry on “Day0”/“Day30” imaging. The new ME criteria do not mandate a timeframe for this assessment. The compliance criteria are: more than 80% of the activity from the written directive for treatment site (TS) must be implanted inside TS, and doses to 1cc of either uninvolved rectum (D1-UR) or uninvolved bladder (D1-UB), or 2cc of other non-specified tissue (D2-UT) must be less than 150% of the planned dose. Methods: “Day0”/“Day30” post-implant analyses for 25 patients were evaluated. Treatment plans had amore » peripheral loading pattern with 2 core needles placed at least 10 mm away from urethra, with several seeds planned outside of the prostate for adequate target coverage. TS were a uniform 5 mm expansion of the prostate, except posteriorly (no expansion). Results: “Day0”/“Day30”analyses found no MEs. The relative changes for D1-UR, D1-UB, and D2-UT were (ranges): [−37.0, 38.2]%, [−96.5, 74.7]%, and [−41.2, 37.7]%. Furthermore, changes did not correlate with prostate volume changes of −18.7% [σ:16.0%, range:−60.5%, +6.4%]. These unfavorable changes did not lead to ME at “Day30” because these values were generally well below 150% at “Day0”. However, D2-UT dose values exceeded those for D1-UR and D1-UB at both “Day0”/“Day30”. Conclusion: The total activity was relatively insensitive to changes in target volume from “Day0” to ”Day30”. The dose metrics of interest, albeit susceptible to large, often unfavorable changes, remained less than the 150% threshold. Data from this study suggest that “Day0” can be used for the regulatory compliance evaluation. However, further evaluation at “Day30” is advisable if D2-UT is 110% or above (based on the largest D2-UT increase of 37.7% observed in this patient population). Future rigorous statistical analysis of a larger cohort will afford a refinement of this recommendation.« less
  • Postimplant evaluation of prostate brachytherapy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 T has met with some difficulties due to the uncertainty associated with seed localization despite the excellent anatomical delineation this imaging modality can achieve. Seeds in vascularized regions or outside the prostate, where signal heterogeneity or drop off can obscure their position, can be difficult to identify. The increase in SNR available at 3.0 T offers the potential to improve these issues with visualization. However, before moving directly to in vivo studies, it is important to investigate the effects of artifact size on the ability to localize multiplemore » seeds in close proximity. These artifacts are of extra concern at higher field because of the increased induced field distortions surrounding the seeds. A single prostate brachytherapy seed (IMC6711, OncoSeed) and arrays of seed pairs were suspended in a porcine gel medium and imaged on 1.5 and 3 T MRI scanners for comparison. Two basic acquisition techniques utilized in a wide array of clinical sequences [spin-echo based and gradient-echo (GE) based] were investigated for the types of artifacts they produce, and their dependence on field. Analysis of the resulting voids was performed to determine the relative size of seeds as seen on the images, as well as the ability to distinguish seeds at close proximity. The seed voids at 3 T were only slightly larger than those obtained at 1.5 T (0.5 mm longer and wider) when using a spin-echo type sequence. For this work, the authors used a proton density fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. These results are promising for the use of 3 T imaging for postimplant evaluation since the SNR will increase by roughly a factor of 2 with only a limited corresponding increase in artifact size. The minimum separation of the seeds to be completely distinguished using void analysis increased from between 1.5 and 3 mm to between 3 and 4.5 mm when going from 1.5 to 3 T FSE imaging. The minimum separation of the seeds for GE at the demonstration TE of 11 ms was found to be between 3 and 4.5 mm for 1.5 T and between 4.5 and 6 mm for 3 T. These GE artifact dimensions will scale down with TE and, as this happens, approach the dimensions of the FSE artifacts given above.« less
  • Purpose: The low dose rate brachytherapy procedure would benefit from an intraoperative postimplant dosimetry verification technique to identify possible suboptimal dose coverage and suggest a potential reimplantation. The main objective of this project is to develop an efficient, operator-free, intraoperative seed detection technique using the imaging modalities available in a low dose rate brachytherapy treatment room. Methods: This intraoperative detection allows a complete dosimetry calculation that can be performed right after an I-125 prostate seed implantation, while the patient is still under anesthesia. To accomplish this, a digital tomosynthesis-based algorithm was developed. This automatic filtered reconstruction of the 3D volumemore » requires seven projections acquired over a total angle of 60 deg. with an isocentric imaging system. Results: A phantom study was performed to validate the technique that was used in a retrospective clinical study involving 23 patients. In the patient study, the automatic tomosynthesis-based reconstruction yielded seed detection rates of 96.7% and 2.6% false positives. The seed localization error obtained with a phantom study is 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The average time needed for reconstruction is below 1 min. The reconstruction algorithm also provides the seed orientation with an uncertainty of 10 deg. {+-}8 deg. The seed detection algorithm presented here is reliable and was efficiently used in the clinic. Conclusions: When combined with an appropriate coregistration technique to identify the organs in the seed coordinate system, this algorithm will offer new possibilities for a next generation of clinical brachytherapy systems.« less
  • Purpose: In radiation treatment planning, delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) is very important, because the GTVs affect the accuracies of radiation therapy procedure. To assist radiation oncologists in the delineation of GTV regions while treatment planning for lung cancer, we have proposed a machine-learning-based delineation framework of GTV regions of solid and ground glass opacity (GGO) lung tumors following by optimum contour selection (OCS) method. Methods: Our basic idea was to feed voxel-based image features around GTV contours determined by radiation oncologists into a machine learning classifier in the training step, after which the classifier produced the degree ofmore » GTV for each voxel in the testing step. Ten data sets of planning CT and PET/CT images were selected for this study. The support vector machine (SVM), which learned voxel-based features which include voxel value and magnitudes of image gradient vector that obtained from each voxel in the planning CT and PET/CT images, extracted initial GTV regions. The final GTV regions were determined using the OCS method that was able to select a global optimum object contour based on multiple active delineations with a level set method around the GTV. To evaluate the results of proposed framework for ten cases (solid:6, GGO:4), we used the three-dimensional Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which denoted the degree of region similarity between the GTVs delineated by radiation oncologists and the proposed framework. Results: The proposed method achieved an average three-dimensional DSC of 0.81 for ten lung cancer patients, while a standardized uptake value-based method segmented GTV regions with the DSC of 0.43. The average DSCs for solid and GGO were 0.84 and 0.76, respectively, obtained by the proposed framework. Conclusion: The proposed framework with the support vector machine may be useful for assisting radiation oncologists in delineating solid and GGO lung tumors.« less