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Title: SU-F-T-674: In Vitro Study of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photo Dynamic Therapy in Human Cancer Cell Lines

Abstract

Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PTD) is a promising cancer treatment modality. 5-sminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a clinically approved photosensitizer. Here we studied the effect of 5-ALA administration with irradiation on several cell lines in vitro. Methods: Human head and neck (FaDu), lung (A549) and prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells (104/well) were seeded overnight in 96-well plates (Figure 1). 5-ALA at a range from 0.1 to 30.0mg/ml was added to confluent cells 3h before irradiation in 100ul of culture medium. 15MV photon beams from a Siemens Artiste linear accelerator were used to deliver 2 Gy dose in one fraction to the cells. Cell viability was evaluated by WST1 assay. The development of orange color was measured 3h after the addition of WST-1 reagent at 450nm on an Envision Multilabel Reader (Figure 2) and directly correlated to cell number. Control, untreated cells were incubated without 5-ALA. The experiment was performed twice for each cell line. Results: The cell viability rates for the head and neck cancer line are shown in Figure 3. FaDu cell viability was reduced significantly to 36.5% (5-ALA) and 18.1% (5-ALA + RT) only at the highest concentration of 5-ALA, 30mg/ml. This effect was observed in neither A549, nor LNCaP cellmore » line. No toxicity was detected at lower 5-ALA concentrations. Conclusion: Application of 5-ALA and subsequent PDT was found to be cytotoxic at the highest dose of the photosensitizer used in the FaDu head and neck cell line, and their effect was synergistic. Further efforts are necessary to study the potential therapeutic effects of 5-ALA PTD in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest 5-ALA may improve the efficacy of radiotherapy by acting as a radiomediator in head and neck cancer.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649229
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CULTURE MEDIA; HEAD; IN VITRO; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PHOTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY; VIABILITY

Citation Formats

Cvetkovic, D, Wang, B, Gupta, R, and Ma, C. SU-F-T-674: In Vitro Study of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photo Dynamic Therapy in Human Cancer Cell Lines. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956860.
Cvetkovic, D, Wang, B, Gupta, R, & Ma, C. SU-F-T-674: In Vitro Study of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photo Dynamic Therapy in Human Cancer Cell Lines. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956860.
Cvetkovic, D, Wang, B, Gupta, R, and Ma, C. 2016. "SU-F-T-674: In Vitro Study of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photo Dynamic Therapy in Human Cancer Cell Lines". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956860.
@article{osti_22649229,
title = {SU-F-T-674: In Vitro Study of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Photo Dynamic Therapy in Human Cancer Cell Lines},
author = {Cvetkovic, D and Wang, B and Gupta, R and Ma, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Photodynamic therapy (PTD) is a promising cancer treatment modality. 5-sminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a clinically approved photosensitizer. Here we studied the effect of 5-ALA administration with irradiation on several cell lines in vitro. Methods: Human head and neck (FaDu), lung (A549) and prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells (104/well) were seeded overnight in 96-well plates (Figure 1). 5-ALA at a range from 0.1 to 30.0mg/ml was added to confluent cells 3h before irradiation in 100ul of culture medium. 15MV photon beams from a Siemens Artiste linear accelerator were used to deliver 2 Gy dose in one fraction to the cells. Cell viability was evaluated by WST1 assay. The development of orange color was measured 3h after the addition of WST-1 reagent at 450nm on an Envision Multilabel Reader (Figure 2) and directly correlated to cell number. Control, untreated cells were incubated without 5-ALA. The experiment was performed twice for each cell line. Results: The cell viability rates for the head and neck cancer line are shown in Figure 3. FaDu cell viability was reduced significantly to 36.5% (5-ALA) and 18.1% (5-ALA + RT) only at the highest concentration of 5-ALA, 30mg/ml. This effect was observed in neither A549, nor LNCaP cell line. No toxicity was detected at lower 5-ALA concentrations. Conclusion: Application of 5-ALA and subsequent PDT was found to be cytotoxic at the highest dose of the photosensitizer used in the FaDu head and neck cell line, and their effect was synergistic. Further efforts are necessary to study the potential therapeutic effects of 5-ALA PTD in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest 5-ALA may improve the efficacy of radiotherapy by acting as a radiomediator in head and neck cancer.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956860},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The in vitro response to radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs of cell lines established from 7 patients with small cell (SC) lung cancer were tested using a soft agarose clonogenic assay. Five cell lines retained the typical morphological and biochemical amine precursor uptake decarboxylation characteristics of SC, while two cell lines had undergone ''transformation'' to large cell (LC) morphological variants with loss of amine precursor uptake decarboxylation cell characteristics of SC. The radiation survival curves for the SC lines were characterized by D0 values ranging from 51 to 140 rads and extrapolation values (n) ranging from 1.0 to 3.3. While themore » D0 values of the radiation survival curves of the LC variants were similar (91 and 80 rads), the extrapolation values were 5.6 and 11.1 In vitro chemosensitivity testing of the cell lines revealed an excellent correlation between prior treatment status of the patient and in vitro sensitivity or resistance. No correlation was observed between in vitro chemosensitivity and radiation response. These data suggest that transformation of SC to LC with loss of amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation characteristics is associated with a marked increase in radiation resistance (n) in vitro. The observation of a 2- to 5-fold increase in survival of the LC compared to the SC lines following 200 rads suggests that the use of larger daily radiation fractions and/or radiation-sensitizing drugs might lead to a significantly greater clinical response in patients with LC morphology. This clinical approach may have a major impact on patient response and survival.« less
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