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Title: SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images

Abstract

Purpose: Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for multiple intracranial lesions with frequent surveillance is becoming a popular treatment option. This strategy leads to retreatment with SRS as new lesions arise. Currently, each course of treatment uses magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images for treatment planning. We propose that new MR images, with course 1 CT images, may be used for future treatment plans with negligible loss of dosimetric accuracy. Methods: Ten patients that received multiple courses of SRS were retrospectively reviewed. The treatment plans and contours from non-initial courses were copied to the initial CTs and recalculated. Doses metrics for the plans calculated on the initial CTs and later CTs were compared. All CT scans were acquired on a Philips CT scanner with a 600 mm field of view and 1 mm slice thickness (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). All targets were planned to 20 Gy and calculated in Eclipse V. 13.6 (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) using analytic anisotropic algorithm with 1 mm calculation grid. Results: Sixteen lesions were evaluated. The mean time between courses was 250 +/− 215 days (range 103–979). The mean target volume was 2.0 +/− 2.9 cc (range 0.1–10.1). The average difference in meanmore » target dose between the two calculations was 0.2 +/− 0.3 Gy (range 0.0 – 1.0). The mean conformity index (CI) was 1.28 +/− 0.14 (range 1.07 – 1.82). The average difference in CI was 0.03 +/− 0.16 (range 0.00 – 0.44). Targets volumes < 0.5 cc showed the largest changes in both metrics. Conclusion: Continued treatment based on initial CT images is feasible. Dose calculation on the initial CT for future treatments provides reasonable dosimetric accuracy. Changes in dose metrics are largest for small volumes, and are likely dominated by partial volume effects in target definition.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649187
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; GY RANGE 10-100; IMAGES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; METRICS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Wiant, D, Manning, M, Liu, H, Maurer, J, Hayes, T, and Sintay, B. SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956811.
Wiant, D, Manning, M, Liu, H, Maurer, J, Hayes, T, & Sintay, B. SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956811.
Wiant, D, Manning, M, Liu, H, Maurer, J, Hayes, T, and Sintay, B. 2016. "SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956811.
@article{osti_22649187,
title = {SU-F-T-626: Intracranial SRS Re-Treatment Without Acquisition of New CT Images},
author = {Wiant, D and Manning, M and Liu, H and Maurer, J and Hayes, T and Sintay, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for multiple intracranial lesions with frequent surveillance is becoming a popular treatment option. This strategy leads to retreatment with SRS as new lesions arise. Currently, each course of treatment uses magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images for treatment planning. We propose that new MR images, with course 1 CT images, may be used for future treatment plans with negligible loss of dosimetric accuracy. Methods: Ten patients that received multiple courses of SRS were retrospectively reviewed. The treatment plans and contours from non-initial courses were copied to the initial CTs and recalculated. Doses metrics for the plans calculated on the initial CTs and later CTs were compared. All CT scans were acquired on a Philips CT scanner with a 600 mm field of view and 1 mm slice thickness (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). All targets were planned to 20 Gy and calculated in Eclipse V. 13.6 (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) using analytic anisotropic algorithm with 1 mm calculation grid. Results: Sixteen lesions were evaluated. The mean time between courses was 250 +/− 215 days (range 103–979). The mean target volume was 2.0 +/− 2.9 cc (range 0.1–10.1). The average difference in mean target dose between the two calculations was 0.2 +/− 0.3 Gy (range 0.0 – 1.0). The mean conformity index (CI) was 1.28 +/− 0.14 (range 1.07 – 1.82). The average difference in CI was 0.03 +/− 0.16 (range 0.00 – 0.44). Targets volumes < 0.5 cc showed the largest changes in both metrics. Conclusion: Continued treatment based on initial CT images is feasible. Dose calculation on the initial CT for future treatments provides reasonable dosimetric accuracy. Changes in dose metrics are largest for small volumes, and are likely dominated by partial volume effects in target definition.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956811},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To review the effectiveness of reduced-dose and restricted-volume radiation-only therapy in the treatment of intracranial germinoma and to assess the feasibility of reducing or eliminating the use of chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and March 2007, a retrospective analysis was performed that included 38 patients who received either reduced radiation alone (30 Gy for 26 patients) or reduced radiation with chemotherapy (n = 12 patients). All 38 patients received extended focal (including whole-ventricle) irradiation and were followed up until February 2008. Overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were calculated. Variables associated with survival were evaluatedmore » by univariate Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Median follow-up was 62.4 months (range, 10.1-142.5 months). The total 5-year OS rate was 93.7%. The 5-year OS and RFS rates for patients receiving radiation only were 100% and 96.2%, respectively. The rates for those receiving radiation plus chemotherapy were 83.3 % and 91.7%, respectively (not statistically significant). No predictive factor was significantly associated with the OS or RFS rate. Chemotherapy had no significant effect on survival but was associated with a higher incidence of treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: A further decrease in the radiation dose to 30 Gy with whole-ventricle irradiation is sufficient to treat selected patients with intracranial germinoma. Wide-field irradiation or chemotherapy should be avoided as these methods are unnecessary. Thus, reduction of the radiation dose to 30 Gy may be feasible, even without chemotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Segmentation of aneurysms plays an important role in interventional planning. Yet, the segmentation of both the lumen and the thrombus of an intracranial aneurysm in computed tomography angiography (CTA) remains a challenge. This paper proposes a multilevel segmentation methodology for efficiently segmenting intracranial aneurysms in CTA images. Methods: The proposed methodology first uses the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to extract the lumen part directly from the original image. Then, the LBM is applied again on an intermediate image whose lumen part is filled by the mean gray-level value outside the lumen, to yield an image region containing part ofmore » the aneurysm boundary. After that, an expanding disk is introduced to estimate the complete contour of the aneurysm. Finally, the contour detected is used as the initial contour of the level set with ellipse to refine the aneurysm. Results: The results obtained on 11 patients from different hospitals showed that the proposed segmentation was comparable with manual segmentation, and that quantitatively, the average segmentation matching factor (SMF) reached 86.99%, demonstrating good segmentation accuracy. Chan–Vese method, Sen’s model, and Luca’s model were used to compare the proposed method and their average SMF values were 39.98%, 40.76%, and 77.11%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors have presented a multilevel segmentation method based on the LBM and level set with ellipse for accurate segmentation of intracranial aneurysms. Compared to three existing methods, for all eleven patients, the proposed method can successfully segment the lumen with the highest SMF values for nine patients and second highest SMF values for the two. It also segments the entire aneurysm with the highest SMF values for ten patients and second highest SMF value for the one. This makes it potential for clinical assessment of the volume and aspect ratio of the intracranial aneurysms.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate dose conformity, dose homogeneity, and dose gradient in helical tomotherapy treatment plans for stereotactic radiosurgery, and compare results with step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients were selected with a mean tumor size of 14.65 {+-} 11.2 cm{sup 3}. Original step-and-shoot IMRS treatment plans used coplanar fields because of the constraint of the beam stopper. Retrospective step-and-shoot IMRS plans were generated using noncoplanar fields. Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were generated using the tomotherapy planning station. Dose conformity index, dose gradient score index, and homogeneity index were used in plan intercomparisons. Results: Noncoplanar IMRSmore » plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, but not dose homogeneity, compared with coplanar IMRS plans. Tomotherapy plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, yet increased dose heterogeneity compared with noncoplanar IMRS plans. The average dose conformity index values were 1.53 {+-} 0.38, 1.35 {+-} 0.15, and 1.26 {+-} 0.10 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The average dose homogeneity index values were 1.15 {+-} 0.05, 1.13 {+-} 0.04, and 1.18 {+-} 0.09 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean dose gradient score index values were 1.37 {+-} 19.08, 22.32 {+-} 19.20, and 43.28 {+-} 13.78 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean treatment time in tomotherapy was 42 {+-} 16 min. Conclusions: We were able to achieve better dose conformity and dose gradient in tomotherapy plans compared with step-and-shoot IMRS plans for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. However, tomotherapy treatment time was significantly larger than that in step-and-shoot IMRS.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a framework to the inverse problem for radiosurgery treatment planning on the Gamma Knife{sup Registered-Sign} Perfexion Trade-Mark-Sign (PFX) for intracranial targets. Methods: The approach taken in the present study consists of two parts. First, a hybrid grassfire and sphere-packing algorithm is used to obtain shot positions (isocenters) based on the geometry of the target to be treated. For the selected isocenters, a sector duration optimization (SDO) model is used to optimize the duration of radiation delivery from each collimator size from each individual source bank. The SDO model is solved usingmore » a projected gradient algorithm. This approach has been retrospectively tested on seven manually planned clinical cases (comprising 11 lesions) including acoustic neuromas and brain metastases. Results: In terms of conformity and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, the quality of plans achieved with the inverse planning approach were, on average, improved compared to the manually generated plans. The mean difference in conformity index between inverse and forward plans was -0.12 (range: -0.27 to +0.03) and +0.08 (range: 0.00-0.17) for classic and Paddick definitions, respectively, favoring the inverse plans. The mean difference in volume receiving the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) between forward and inverse plans was 0.2% (range: -2.4% to +2.0%). After plan renormalization for equivalent coverage (i.e., V{sub 100}), the mean difference in dose to 1 mm{sup 3} of brainstem between forward and inverse plans was -0.24 Gy (range: -2.40 to +2.02 Gy) favoring the inverse plans. Beam-on time varied with the number of isocenters but for the most optimal plans was on average 33 min longer than manual plans (range: -17 to +91 min) when normalized to a calibration dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. In terms of algorithm performance, the isocenter selection for all the presented plans was performed in less than 3 s, while the SDO was performed in an average of 215 min. Conclusions: PFX inverse planning can be performed using geometric isocenter selection and mathematical modeling and optimization techniques. The obtained treatment plans all meet or exceed clinical guidelines while displaying high conformity.« less
  • Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically,more » represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.« less