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Title: SU-F-T-593: Technical Treatment Accuracy in a Clinic of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to estimate technical treatment accuracy in fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) using extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife (GK). Methods: The fSRS with GK relies on a patient specific re-locatable immobilization system. The reference treatment position is estimated using a digital probe and a repositioning check tool (RCT). The “calibration values” of RCT apertures were compared with measured values on RCT-QA tool to evaluate the standard error (SE) associated with RCT measurements. A treatment plan with single “4 mm collimator shot” was created to deliver a radiation dose of 5 Gy at the predefined plane of a newly designed in-house head-neck phantom. The plan was investigated using radiochromic EBT3 films. The stereotactic CT imaging of a designed mini CT phantom and distortion study of MR imaging, were combined to calculate imaging SE. The focal precision check for GK machine tolerance was performed using a central diode test tool. Results: Twenty observations of RCT and digital probe, shown the SE of +/−0.0186mm and +/−0.0002mm respectively. A mean positional shift of 0.2752mm (σ=0.0696mm) was observed for twenty similar treatment settings of head-neck phantom. The difference between radiological and predefined exposure point was 0.4650mm and 0.4270mm; formore » two independent experiments. The imaging studies showed a combined SE of +/− 0.1055mm. Twenty frequent runs of a diode test tool showed the tolerance SE of +/−0.0096mm. If, the measurements are considered to be at 95% of confidence level, an expanded uncertainty was evaluated as +/− 0.2371mm with our system. The positional shift, when combined with an expanded uncertainty, a trivial variation of 0.07mm (max) was observed in comparing resultant radiological precision through film investigations. Conclusion: The study proposes an expression of “technical treatment accuracy” within “known uncertainties” is rational in the estimation of routine fSRS quality. The research work is supported by the research section of “All India Institute of Medical Sciences” - New Delhi, India under project no A-247.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Delhi, Delhi (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649168
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Bisht, R, Kale, S, Natanasabapathi, G, Singh, M, Agarwal, D, Rath, G, Julka, P, Kumar, P, Thulkar, S, Garg, A, and Sharma, B. SU-F-T-593: Technical Treatment Accuracy in a Clinic of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956778.
Bisht, R, Kale, S, Natanasabapathi, G, Singh, M, Agarwal, D, Rath, G, Julka, P, Kumar, P, Thulkar, S, Garg, A, & Sharma, B. SU-F-T-593: Technical Treatment Accuracy in a Clinic of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956778.
Bisht, R, Kale, S, Natanasabapathi, G, Singh, M, Agarwal, D, Rath, G, Julka, P, Kumar, P, Thulkar, S, Garg, A, and Sharma, B. 2016. "SU-F-T-593: Technical Treatment Accuracy in a Clinic of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956778.
@article{osti_22649168,
title = {SU-F-T-593: Technical Treatment Accuracy in a Clinic of Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery},
author = {Bisht, R and Kale, S and Natanasabapathi, G and Singh, M and Agarwal, D and Rath, G and Julka, P and Kumar, P and Thulkar, S and Garg, A and Sharma, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this study is to estimate technical treatment accuracy in fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (fSRS) using extend system (ES) of Gamma Knife (GK). Methods: The fSRS with GK relies on a patient specific re-locatable immobilization system. The reference treatment position is estimated using a digital probe and a repositioning check tool (RCT). The “calibration values” of RCT apertures were compared with measured values on RCT-QA tool to evaluate the standard error (SE) associated with RCT measurements. A treatment plan with single “4 mm collimator shot” was created to deliver a radiation dose of 5 Gy at the predefined plane of a newly designed in-house head-neck phantom. The plan was investigated using radiochromic EBT3 films. The stereotactic CT imaging of a designed mini CT phantom and distortion study of MR imaging, were combined to calculate imaging SE. The focal precision check for GK machine tolerance was performed using a central diode test tool. Results: Twenty observations of RCT and digital probe, shown the SE of +/−0.0186mm and +/−0.0002mm respectively. A mean positional shift of 0.2752mm (σ=0.0696mm) was observed for twenty similar treatment settings of head-neck phantom. The difference between radiological and predefined exposure point was 0.4650mm and 0.4270mm; for two independent experiments. The imaging studies showed a combined SE of +/− 0.1055mm. Twenty frequent runs of a diode test tool showed the tolerance SE of +/−0.0096mm. If, the measurements are considered to be at 95% of confidence level, an expanded uncertainty was evaluated as +/− 0.2371mm with our system. The positional shift, when combined with an expanded uncertainty, a trivial variation of 0.07mm (max) was observed in comparing resultant radiological precision through film investigations. Conclusion: The study proposes an expression of “technical treatment accuracy” within “known uncertainties” is rational in the estimation of routine fSRS quality. The research work is supported by the research section of “All India Institute of Medical Sciences” - New Delhi, India under project no A-247.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956778},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate tumor control and side effects associated with radiosurgery (RS) and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SFR) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in a group of patients treated at the same institution. Methods and Materials: Between May 1997 and June 2007, 115 consecutive cases of VS were treated in our department. The SFR group (47 patients), including larger tumors (maximum diameter >1.5 cm), received a total dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The RS group (68 patients, maximum diameter <1.5 cm) received a total dose of 12 Gy at the 100% isodose. Evaluation included serial imaging tests (magneticmore » resonance imaging) and neurologic and functional hearing examinations. Results: The tumor control rate was 97.9% in the SFR group for a mean follow-up time of 32.1 months and 98.5% in the RS group for a mean follow-up time of 30.1 months. Hearing function was preserved after RS in 85% of the patients and after SFR in 79%. Facial and trigeminal nerve function remained mostly unaffected after SFR. After RS, new trigeminal neuropathy occurred in 9 of 68 patients (13%). Conclusions: A high tumor control rate and low number of side effects are registered after SFR and RS of VS. These results confirm that considering tumor diameter, both RS and SFR are good treatment modalities for VS.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. Results: According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%,more » local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. Conclusions: The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions.« less
  • An acrylic phantom was designed and constructed to assess the geometrical accuracy of CT, MRI and PET images for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The phantom was suited for each image modality with a specific tracer and compared with CT images to measure the radial deviation between the reference marks in the phantom. It was found that for MRI the maximum mean deviation is 1.9 {+-} 0.2 mm compared to 2.4 {+-} 0.3 mm reported for PET. These results will be used for margin outlining in SRS and SRT treatment planning.
  • Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range,more » 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence and predictive factors for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with acoustic neuromas (AN) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seventy-two patients with AN were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 (45-50 Gy in 25-30 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks). The pretreatment MRI scan was assessed for tumor characteristics and anatomic distortion independently of subsequent outcome and correlated with the risk of hydrocephalus. Results: At a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 1-120 months), 5-year event-free survival was 95%. Eight patients (11%) developed hydrocephalus within 19 months of radiotherapy,more » which was successfully treated. On univariate analysis, pretreatment factors predictive of hydrocephalus were maximum diameter (p = 0.005), proximity to midline (p = 0.009), displacement of the fourth ventricle (p = 0.02), partial effacement of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.001), contact with the medulla (p = 0.005), and more brainstem structures (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for fourth ventricular effacement, no other variables remained independently associated with hydrocephalus formation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in excellent tumor control of AN, albeit with a risk of developing hydrocephalus. Patients at high risk, identified as those with larger tumors with partial effacement of the fourth ventricle before treatment, should be monitored more closely during follow-up. It would also be preferable to offer treatment to patients with progressive AN while the risk of hydrocephalus is low, before the development of marked distortion of fourth ventricle before tumor diameter significantly exceeds 2 cm.« less