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Title: SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study

Abstract

Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fraction and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion:more » CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Mercy Health, Saint Mary’s, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649119
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; NEOPLASMS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Bichay, T, and Mayville, A. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956723.
Bichay, T, & Mayville, A. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956723.
Bichay, T, and Mayville, A. 2016. "SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956723.
@article{osti_22649119,
title = {SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study},
author = {Bichay, T and Mayville, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fraction and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion: CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956723},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using the Monte Carlo algorithm (MC) and Ray-Trace algorithm (effective path length method, EPL) for CyberKnife treatments of lung tumors. Materials and Methods: An acceptable treatment plan is created using Multiplan 2.1 and MC dose calculation. Dose is prescribed to the isodose line encompassing 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and this is the plan clinically delivered. For comparison, the Ray-Trace algorithm with heterogeneity correction (EPL) is used to recalculate the dose distribution for this plan using the same beams, beam directions, and monitor units (MUs). Results: The maximum doses calculated by themore » EPL to target PTV are uniformly larger than the MC plans by up to a factor of 1.63. Up to a factor of four larger maximum dose differences are observed for the critical structures in the chest. More beams traversing larger distances through low density lung are associated with larger differences, consistent with the fact that the EPL overestimates doses in low-density structures and this effect is more pronounced as collimator size decreases. Conclusions: We establish that changing the treatment plan calculation algorithm from EPL to MC can produce large differences in target and critical organs' dose coverage. The observed discrepancies are larger for plans using smaller collimator sizes and have strong dependency on the anatomical relationship of target-critical structures.« less
  • Purpose: MultiPlan, the treatment planning system for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery system offers two approaches to dose computation, namely Ray-Tracing (RT), the default technique and Monte Carlo (MC), an option. RT is deterministic, however it accounts for primary heterogeneity only. MC on the other hand has an uncertainty associated with the calculation results. The advantage is that in addition, it accounts for heterogeneity effects on the scattered dose. Not all sites will benefit from MC. The goal of this work was to focus on central nervous system (CNS) tumors and compare dosimetrically, treatment plans computed with RT versus MC. Methods:more » Treatment plans were computed using both RT and MC for sites covering (a) the brain (b) C-spine (c) upper T-spine (d) lower T-spine (e) L-spine and (f) sacrum. RT was first used to compute clinically valid treatment plans. Then the same treatment parameters, monitor units, beam weights, etc., were used in the MC algorithm to compute the dose distribution. The plans were then compared for tumor coverage to illustrate the difference if any. All MC calculations were performed at a 1% uncertainty. Results: Using the RT technique, the tumor coverage for the brain, C-spine (C3–C7), upper T-spine (T4–T6), lower T-spine (T10), Lspine (L2) and sacrum were 96.8%, 93.1%, 97.2%, 87.3%, 91.1%, and 95.3%. The corresponding tumor coverage based on the MC approach was 98.2%, 95.3%, 87.55%, 88.2%, 92.5%, and 95.3%. It should be noted that the acceptable planning target coverage for our clinical practice is >95%. The coverage can be compromised for spine tumors to spare normal tissues such as the spinal cord. Conclusion: For treatment planning involving the CNS, RT and MC appear to be similar for most sites but for the T-spine area where most of the beams traverse lung tissue. In this case, MC is highly recommended.« less
  • Purpose: To study the feasibility of treating multiple brain tumors withlarge number of noncoplanar IMRT beams. Methods: Thirty beams are selected from 390 deliverable beams separated by six degree in 4pi space. Beam selection optimization is based on a column generation algorithm. MLC leaf size is 2 mm. Dose matrices are calculated with collapsed cone convolution and superposition method in a 2 mm by 2mm by 2 mm grid. Twelve brain tumors of various shapes, sizes and locations are used to generate four plans treating 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumors. The radiation dose was 20 Gy prescribed to themore » 100% isodose line. Dose Volume Histograms for tumor and brain were compared. Results: All results are based on a 2 mm by 2 mm by 2 mm CT grid. For 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumor plans, minimum tumor doses are all 20 Gy. Mean tumor dose are 20.0, 20.1, 20.1 and 20.1 Gy. Maximum tumor dose are 23.3, 23.6, 25.4 and 25.4 Gy. Mean ventricles dose are 0.7, 1.7, 2.4 and 3.1 Gy.Mean subventricular zone dose are 0.8, 1.3, 2.2 and 3.2 Gy. Average Equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values for tumor are 20.1, 20.1, 20.2 and 20.2 Gy. The conformity index (CI) values are close to 1 for all 4 plans. The gradient index (GI) values are 2.50, 2.05, 2.09 and 2.19. Conclusion: Compared with published Gamma Knife treatment studies, noncoplanar IMRT treatment plan is superior in terms of dose conformity. Due to maximum limit of beams per plan, Gamma knife has to treat multiple tumors separately in different plans. Noncoplanar IMRT plans theoretically can be delivered in a single plan on any modern linac with an automated couch and image guidance. This warrants further study of using noncoplanar IMRT as a viable treatment solution for multiple brain tumors.« less
  • Purpose: In highly-conformal radiotherapy, due to the complexity of both beam configurations and dose distributions, traditional in vivo dosimetry is unpractical or even impossible. The ideal dosimeter would be implanted inside the planning treatment volume so that it can directly measure the total delivered dose during each fraction with no additional uncertainty due to calculation models. The aim of this work is to verify if implantable metal oxide semiconductors field effect transistors (MOSFETs) can achieve a sufficient degree of dosimetric accuracy when used inside extracranial targets undergoing radiotherapy treatments using the Cyberknife system. Methods: Based on the preliminary findings ofmore » this study, new prototypes for high dose fractionations were developed to reduce the time dependence for long treatment delivery times. These dosimeters were recently cleared and are marketed as DVS-HFT. Multiple measurements were performed using both Virtual Water and water phantoms to characterize implantable MOSFETs under the Cyberknife beams, and included the reference-dosimetry consistency, the dependence of the response on the collimator size, on the daily delivered dose, and the time irradiation modality. Finally a Cyberknife prostate treatment simulation using a body phantom was conducted, and both MOSFET and ionization readings were compared to Monte Carlo calculations. The feasibility analysis was conducted based on the ratios of the absorbed dose divided by the dose reading, named as ''further calibration factor'' (FCF). Results: The average FCFs resulted to be 0.98 for the collimator dependence test, and about 1.00 for the reference-dosimetry test, the dose-dependence test, and the time-dependence test. The average FCF of the prostate treatment simulation test was 0.99. Conclusions: The obtained results are well within DVS specifications, that is, the factory calibration is still valid for such kind of treatments using the Cyberknife system, with no need of further calibration factors to be applied. The final accuracy of implantable MOSFETs when used for such kind of treatments was estimated to be within {+-}4%. Additional investigations using dose/fraction higher than 12 Gy, different beam configurations, and tracking systems could extend the present findings to other kind of treatments. MOSFET technology was proven to have high versatility in fast adaptation of existing detectors to new applications. It is plausible to expect a general feasibility of implantable MOSFET technology for in vivo dosimetry of the extracranial-targets treatments using the Cyberknife, provided each particular application will be validated by suitable both physical and clinical studies.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the ability of CyberKnife to track surgical clips used as fiducial markers. Methods: The Octavius 1000SRS detector and solid water (RW3) slab phantom were used with motion platform to evaluate the study. The RW3 slab phantom was set up to measure the dose distribution from coronal plane. It consists of 9 plates and the thickness of each plate is 10mm. Among them, one plate was attached with 3 surgical clips, which are orthogonally positioned on outer region of array. The length of attached clip was represented as 1cm on planning CT. The clip plate was placed onmore » the 1000SRS detector and 3 slabs were stacked up on the plate to build the measuring depth. Below the detector, 5 slabs were set. The two-axis motion platform was programmed with 1D sinusoidal movement (20mm peak-to-peak, 3s period) toward superior/inferior and left/right directions to simulate target motion. During delivery, two clips were extracted by two X-ray imagers, which led to translational error correction only. Synchrony was also used for dynamic tracking. After the irradiation, the measured dose distribution of coronal plane was compared with the planar dose distribution calculated by the CyberKnife treatment planning system (Multiplan) for cross verification. The results were assessed by comparing the absolute Gamma (γ) index. Results: The dose distributions measured by the 1000SRS detector were in good agreements with those calculated by Multiplan. In the dosimetric comparison using γ-function criteria based on the distance-to-agreement of 3mm and the local dose difference of 3%, the passing rate with γ- parameter ≤1 was 91% in coronal plane. Conclusion: The surgical clips can be considered as new fiducials for robotic radiosurgery delivery by considering the target margin with less than 5mm.« less