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Title: SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR

Abstract

Purpose: To determine whether the electron return effect (ERE) has deleterious effects on lung SABR plans optimized in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. Methods: Data from five NSCLC-SABR patients were used. The Dose was modeled with a 2.5 mm dose grid in the presence and absence of a magnetic field using the Monaco (Elekta) TPS with the Monte Carlo GPUMCD (v5.1) algorithm. For each patient, two plans were generated, one using our conventional Elekta Agility linac beam model and another using the Elekta MRI Linac (MRL) model. Both plans were generated on the average CT using similar dose constraints and a 5 mm PTV. The optimization was performed using our clinic’s planning criteria, with normalization of the targets such that their V99% was equal to 99%. The OAR DVHs were compared for each patient. Results: The DVH plots revealed that there were limited differences when optimizing plans in the presence or absence of the magnetic field. The mean of the absolute differences, between the two planning types, in the equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) for the OARs were: 0.3 Gy (range of 0.0 - 1.0 Gy) for the esophagus, 0.6 Gy (range of 0.1 – 1.9 Gy)more » for the heart, 0.5 Gy (range of 0.2 – 0.8 Gy) for the lungs, and 0.6 Gy (range of 0.2 – 1.5 Gy) for the spinal canal. Regarding the maximum doses to the serial organs, the mean of the differences were 3.0 Gy (esophagus) and 0.9 Gy (spinal canal). No trends in the differences were observed. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that there were no major differences between plans optimized using a conventional linac and those optimized using an MRI linac with an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. This is attributed to the consideration of the ERE in the optimization. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649042
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; GY RANGE 01-10; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NMR IMAGING; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; PLANNING

Citation Formats

Al-Ward, S, Kim, A, McCann, C, Ruschin, M, Cheung, P, Sahgal, A, and Keller, B. SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956636.
Al-Ward, S, Kim, A, McCann, C, Ruschin, M, Cheung, P, Sahgal, A, & Keller, B. SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956636.
Al-Ward, S, Kim, A, McCann, C, Ruschin, M, Cheung, P, Sahgal, A, and Keller, B. 2016. "SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956636.
@article{osti_22649042,
title = {SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR},
author = {Al-Ward, S and Kim, A and McCann, C and Ruschin, M and Cheung, P and Sahgal, A and Keller, B},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine whether the electron return effect (ERE) has deleterious effects on lung SABR plans optimized in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. Methods: Data from five NSCLC-SABR patients were used. The Dose was modeled with a 2.5 mm dose grid in the presence and absence of a magnetic field using the Monaco (Elekta) TPS with the Monte Carlo GPUMCD (v5.1) algorithm. For each patient, two plans were generated, one using our conventional Elekta Agility linac beam model and another using the Elekta MRI Linac (MRL) model. Both plans were generated on the average CT using similar dose constraints and a 5 mm PTV. The optimization was performed using our clinic’s planning criteria, with normalization of the targets such that their V99% was equal to 99%. The OAR DVHs were compared for each patient. Results: The DVH plots revealed that there were limited differences when optimizing plans in the presence or absence of the magnetic field. The mean of the absolute differences, between the two planning types, in the equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) for the OARs were: 0.3 Gy (range of 0.0 - 1.0 Gy) for the esophagus, 0.6 Gy (range of 0.1 – 1.9 Gy) for the heart, 0.5 Gy (range of 0.2 – 0.8 Gy) for the lungs, and 0.6 Gy (range of 0.2 – 1.5 Gy) for the spinal canal. Regarding the maximum doses to the serial organs, the mean of the differences were 3.0 Gy (esophagus) and 0.9 Gy (spinal canal). No trends in the differences were observed. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that there were no major differences between plans optimized using a conventional linac and those optimized using an MRI linac with an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. This is attributed to the consideration of the ERE in the optimization. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956636},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume.more » The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy has been presented and clinically evaluated. The introduction of the proposed system in clinical routine may offer valuable new option to radiation oncologists in performing RTP.« less
  • Purpose: A major goal of an effective radiation treatment plan is to deliver the maximum dose to the tumor while minimizing radiation exposure to the surrounding normal structures. For example, due to the radiation exposure to neighboring critical structures during prostate cancer treatment, a significant increase in cancer risk was observed for the bladder (77%) and the rectum (105%) over the following decade. Consequently, an effective treatment plan necessitates limiting the exposure to such organs which can best be achieved by physically displacing the organ at-risk. The goal of this study is to present a prototype for an organ re-positionermore » device designed and fabricated to physically move the rectum away from the path of radiation beam during external beam and brachytherapy treatments. This device affords patient comfort and provides a fully controlled motion to safely relocate the rectum during treatment. Methods: The NiTi shape memory alloy was designed and optimized for manufacturing a rectal re-positioner device through cooling and heating the core alloy for its shaping. This has been achieved through a prototyped custom designed electronic circuit in order to induce the reversible austenitic transformation and was tested rigorously to ensure the integrity of the actuated motion in displacement of the target anatomy. Results: The desirable NiTi shape-setting was configured for easy insertion and based on anatomical constraint. When the final prototype was evaluated, accuracy and precision of the maximum displacement and temperature changes revealed that the device could safely be used within the target anatomy. Conclusion: The organ re-positioner device is a promising tool that can be implemented in clinical setting. It provides a controlled and safe displacement of the delicate organ(s) at risk. The location of the organ being treated could also be identified using conventional onboard imaging devices or MV imaging available on-board most modern clinical accelerators.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. Themore » variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.« less
  • Purpose: The unintended radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) can be contributed from imaging guidance procedures as well as from leakage and scatter of therapeutic beams. This study compares the imaging dose with the unintended out-of-field therapeutic dose to patient sensitive organs. Methods: The Monte Carlo EGSnrc user codes, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc, were used to simulate kV X-ray sources from imaging devices as well as the therapeutic IMRT/VMAT beams and to calculate doses to target and OARs on patient treatment planning CT images. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations was benchmarked against measurements in phantoms. The dose-volume histogrammore » was utilized in analyzing the patient organ doses. Results: The dose resulting from Standard Head kV-CBCT scans to bone and soft tissues ranges from 0.7 to 1.1 cGy and from 0.03 to 0.3 cGy, respectively. The dose resulting from Thorax scans on the chest to bone and soft tissues ranges from 1.1 to 1.8 cGy and from 0.3 to 0.6 cGy, respectively. The dose resulting from Pelvis scans on the abdomen to bone and soft tissues range from 3.2 to 4.2 cGy and from 1.2 to 2.2 cGy, respectively. The out-of-field doses to OAR are sensitive to the distance between the treated target and the OAR. For a typical Head-and-Neck IMRT/VMAT treatment the out-of-field doses to eyes are 1–3% of the target dose, or 2–6 cGy per fraction. Conclusion: The imaging doses to OAR are predictable based on the imaging protocols used when OARs are within the imaged volume and can be estimated and accounted for by using tabulated values. The unintended out-of-field doses are proportional to the target dose, strongly depend on the distance between the treated target and OAR, and are generally higher comparing to the imaging dose. This work was partially supported by Varian research grant VUMC40590.« less
  • Absorbed photoneutron dose to patients undergoing 18 MV x-ray therapy was studied using Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code. Two separate transport simulations were conducted, one for the photoneutron contribution and another for neutron capture gamma rays. The phantom model used was of a female patient receiving a four-field pelvic box treatment. Photoneutron doses were determinate to be higher for organs and tissues located inside the treatment field, especially those closest to the patient's skin. The maximum organ equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose achieved within each treatment port was 719 {mu}Sv/Gy to the rectum (180 deg. field),more » 190 {mu}Sv/Gy to the intestine wall (0 deg. field), 51 {mu}Sv/Gy to the colon wall (90 deg. field), and 45 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin (270 deg. field). The maximum neutron equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose received by organs outside the treatment field was 65 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin in the antero-posterior field. A mean value of 5{+-}2 {mu}Sv/Gy was obtained for organs distant from the treatment field. Distant organ neutron equivalent doses are all of the same order of magnitude and constitute a good estimate of deep organ neutron equivalent doses. Using the risk assessment method of the ICRP-60 report, the greatest likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy dose is estimated to be 0.02% for the pelvic postero-anterior field, the rectum being the organ representing the maximum contribution of 0.011%.« less