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Title: SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {submore » 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)
  2. (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22649025
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BEAMS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; GEOMETRY; HEART; IRRADIATION; LUNGS; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SKIN

Citation Formats

Lim-Reinders, S, University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Keller, B, McCann, C, Sahgal, A, Lee, J, Kim, A, and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956617.
Lim-Reinders, S, University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Keller, B, McCann, C, Sahgal, A, Lee, J, Kim, A, & University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956617.
Lim-Reinders, S, University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Keller, B, McCann, C, Sahgal, A, Lee, J, Kim, A, and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology. Wed . "SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956617.
@article{osti_22649025,
title = {SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation},
author = {Lim-Reinders, S and University of Toronto, Department of Physics and Keller, B and McCann, C and Sahgal, A and Lee, J and Kim, A and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956617},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the dosimetric impact of differing breast tissue compositions for electronic brachytherapy source for high dose rate accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods: A series of Monte Carlo Simulation were created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 10.0). The breast phantom was modeled as a semi-circle with a radius of 5.0 cm. A water balloon with a radius of 1.5 cm was located in the phantom with the Xoft AxxentTM EBT source placed at center as a point source. A mixed of two tissue types (adipose and glandular tissue) was assigned as the materials for the breast phantom withmore » different weight ratios. The proportionality of glandular and adipose tissue was simulated in four different fashions, 80/20, 70/30, 50/50 and 30/70 respectively. The custom energy spectrum for the 50 kVp XOFT source was provided via the manufacturer and used to generate incident photons. The dose distributions were recorded using a parallel three dimensional mesh with a size of 30 × 30 × 30 cm3 with 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 voxels. The simulated doses absorbed along the transverse axis were normalized at the distance of 1 cm and then compared with the calculations using standard TG-43 formalism. Results: All simulations showed underestimation of dose beyond balloon surface compared to standard TG-43 calculations. The maximum percentage differences within 2 cm distance from balloon surface were found to be 18%, 11%, 10% and 8% for the fat breast (30/70), standard breast (50/50), dense breast (70/30 and 80/20), respectively. Conclusion: The accuracy of dose calculations for low energy EBT source was limited when considering tissue heterogeneous composition. The impact of atomic number on photo-electric effect for lower energy Brachytherapy source is not accounted for and resulting in significant errors in dose calculation.« less
  • Purpose: This study investigates the effects of different kinds and designs of commercialized breast implants on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy under a variety of conditions. Methods: The dose for the clinical conventional tangential irradiation, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) breast plans was measured using radiochromic films and stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD). The radiochromic film was used as an integrating dosimeter, while the OSLDs were used for real-time dosimetry to isolate the contribution of dose from individual segment. The films were placed at various slices in the Rando phantom and between the bodymore » and breast surface OSLDs were used to measure skin dose at 18 positions spaced on the two (right/left) breast. The implant breast was placed on the left side and the phantom breast was remained on the right side. Each treatment technique was performed on different size of the breasts and different shape of the breast implant. The PTV dose was prescribed 50.4 Gy and V47.88≥95%. Results: In different shapes of the breast implant, because of the shadow formed extensive around the breast implant, dose variation was relatively higher that of prescribed dose. As the PTV was delineated on the whole breast, maximum 5% dose error and average 3% difference was observed averagely. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin by an average of 25% compared with IMRT. The both IMRT and VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than tangential plans for nearly all dose analyzation. Conclusion: Compared to the other technique, IMRT reduced radiation dose exposure to normal tissues and maintained reasonable target homogeneity and for the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the Planning Target Volume (PTV) margin for Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation (HPBI) using the van Herk formalism (M=2.5∑+0.7σ). HPBI is a novel technique intended to provide local control in breast cancer patients not eligible for surgical resection, using 40 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to the gross disease. Methods: Setup uncertainties were quantified through retrospective analysis of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets, collected prior to (prefraction) and after (postfraction) treatment delivery. During simulation and treatment, patients were immobilized using a wing board and an evacuated bag. Prefraction CBCT was rigidly registered to planning 4-dimensional computed tomographymore » (4DCT) using the chest wall and tumor, and translational couch shifts were applied as needed. This clinical workflow was faithfully reproduced in Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems) to yield residual setup and intrafractional error through translational shifts and rigid registrations (ribs and sternum) of prefraction CBCT to 4DCT and postfraction CBCT to prefraction CBCT, respectively. All ten patients included in this investigation were medically inoperable; the median age was 84 (range, 52–100) years. Results: Systematic (and random) setup uncertainties (in mm) detected for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 0.4 (1.5), 0.8 (1.8) and 0.4 (1.0); net uncertainty was determined to be 0.7 (1.5). Rotations >2° in any axis occurred on 8/72 (11.1%) registrations. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest a non-uniform setup margin (in mm) of 2.2, 3.3 and 1.7 for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions is required for HPBI, given its immobilization techniques and online setup verification protocol. This investigation is ongoing, though published results from similar studies are consistent with the above findings. Determination of margins in breast radiotherapy is a paradigm shift, but a necessary step in moving towards hypofractionated regiments, which may ultimately redefine the standard of care for this select patient population.« less
  • Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range,more » 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.« less
  • Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in amore » Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.« less