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Title: SU-F-T-335: Piecewise Uniform Dose Prescription and Optimization Based On PET/CT Images

Abstract

Purpose: In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the tumor target volume is given a uniform dose prescription, which does not consider the heterogeneous characteristics of tumor such as hypoxia, clonogen density, radiosensitivity, tumor proliferation rate and so on. Our goal is to develop a nonuniform target dose prescription method which can spare organs at risk (OARs) better and does not decrease the tumor control probability (TCP). Methods: We propose a piecewise uniform dose prescription (PUDP) based on PET/CT images of tumor. First, we propose to delineate biological target volumes (BTV) and sub-biological target volumes (sub-BTVs) by our Hierarchical Mumford-Shah Vector Model based on PET/CT images of tumor. Then, in order to spare OARs better, we make the BTV mean dose minimized while restrict the TCP to a constant. So, we can get a general formula for determining an optimal dose prescription based on a linearquadratic model (LQ). However, this dose prescription is high heterogeneous, it is very difficult to deliver by IMRT. Therefore we propose to use the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) in each sub-BTV as its final dose prescription, which makes a PUDP for the BTV. Results: We have evaluated the IMRT planning of a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinomamore » respectively using PUDP and UDP. The results show that the highest and mean doses inside brain stem are 48.425Gy and 19.151Gy respectively when the PUDP is used for IMRT planning, while they are 52.975Gy and 20.0776Gy respectively when the UDP is used. Both of the resulting TCPs(0.9245, 0.9674) are higher than the theoretical TCP(0.8739), when 70Gy is delivered to the BTV. Conclusion: Comparing with the UDP, the PUDP can spare the OARs better while the resulting TCP by PUDP is not significantly lower than by UDP. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China undergrant no.61271382 and by the foundation for construction of scientific project platform forthe cancer hospital of Hunan province.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648938
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; OPTIMIZATION; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TCP

Citation Formats

Liu, G, and Liu, J. SU-F-T-335: Piecewise Uniform Dose Prescription and Optimization Based On PET/CT Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956520.
Liu, G, & Liu, J. SU-F-T-335: Piecewise Uniform Dose Prescription and Optimization Based On PET/CT Images. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956520.
Liu, G, and Liu, J. 2016. "SU-F-T-335: Piecewise Uniform Dose Prescription and Optimization Based On PET/CT Images". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956520.
@article{osti_22648938,
title = {SU-F-T-335: Piecewise Uniform Dose Prescription and Optimization Based On PET/CT Images},
author = {Liu, G and Liu, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the tumor target volume is given a uniform dose prescription, which does not consider the heterogeneous characteristics of tumor such as hypoxia, clonogen density, radiosensitivity, tumor proliferation rate and so on. Our goal is to develop a nonuniform target dose prescription method which can spare organs at risk (OARs) better and does not decrease the tumor control probability (TCP). Methods: We propose a piecewise uniform dose prescription (PUDP) based on PET/CT images of tumor. First, we propose to delineate biological target volumes (BTV) and sub-biological target volumes (sub-BTVs) by our Hierarchical Mumford-Shah Vector Model based on PET/CT images of tumor. Then, in order to spare OARs better, we make the BTV mean dose minimized while restrict the TCP to a constant. So, we can get a general formula for determining an optimal dose prescription based on a linearquadratic model (LQ). However, this dose prescription is high heterogeneous, it is very difficult to deliver by IMRT. Therefore we propose to use the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) in each sub-BTV as its final dose prescription, which makes a PUDP for the BTV. Results: We have evaluated the IMRT planning of a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma respectively using PUDP and UDP. The results show that the highest and mean doses inside brain stem are 48.425Gy and 19.151Gy respectively when the PUDP is used for IMRT planning, while they are 52.975Gy and 20.0776Gy respectively when the UDP is used. Both of the resulting TCPs(0.9245, 0.9674) are higher than the theoretical TCP(0.8739), when 70Gy is delivered to the BTV. Conclusion: Comparing with the UDP, the PUDP can spare the OARs better while the resulting TCP by PUDP is not significantly lower than by UDP. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China undergrant no.61271382 and by the foundation for construction of scientific project platform forthe cancer hospital of Hunan province.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956520},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. Amore » new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.« less
  • An inverse optimization package which is capable of generating nonuniform dose distribution with subregional dose escalation is developed to achieve maximum equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for target while keeping the critical structure doses as low as possible. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps obtained with a dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI technique were used to delineate spatial radiosensitivity distributions. The voxel rCBV was converted to voxel radiosensitivity parameters (e.g., {alpha} and {alpha}/{beta}) based on previously reported correlations between rCBV, tumor grade, and radiosensitivity. A software package, DOSEPAINT, developed using MATLAB, optimizes the beamlet weights to achieve maximum EUD for target whilemore » limiting doses to critical structures. Using DOSEPAINT, we have generated nonuniform 3D-dose distributions for selected patient cases. Depending on the variation of the pixel radiosensitivity, the subregional dose escalation can be as high as 35% of the uniform dose as planned conventionally. The target dose escalation comes from both the inhomogeneous radiosensitivities and the elimination of integral target dose constraint. The target EUDs are found to be higher than those for the uniform dose planned ignoring the spatial inhomogeneous radiosensitivity. The EUDs for organs at risk are found to be approximately equal to or lower than those for the uniform dose plans. In conclusion, we have developed a package that is capable of generating nonuniform dose distributions optimized for spatially inhomogeneous radiosensitivity. Subregional dose escalation may lead to increased treatment effectiveness as indicated by higher EUDs. The current development will impact biological image guided radiotherapy.« less
  • We investigate whether IMRT optimization based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) objectives for organs at risk (OAR) results in superior dosimetric outcomes when compared with multiple dose-volume (DV)-based objectives plans for patients with intact breast and postmastectomy chest wall (CW) cancer. Four separate IMRT plans were prepared for each of the breast and CW cases (10 patients). The first three plans used our standard in-house, physician-selected, DV objectives (phys-plan); gEUD-based objectives for the OARs (gEUD-plan); and multiple, 'very stringent,' DV objectives for each OAR and PTV (DV-plan), respectively. The fourth plan was only beam-fluence optimized (FO-plan), without segmentation, whichmore » used the same objectives as in the DV-plan. The latter plan was to be used as an 'optimum' benchmark without the effects of the segmentation for deliverability. Dosimetric quantities, such as V{sub 20Gy} for the ipsilateral lung and mean dose (D{sub mean}) for heart, contralateral breast, and contralateral lung were used to evaluate the results. For all patients in this study, we have seen that the gEUD-based plans allow greater sparing of the OARs while maintaining equivalent target coverage. The average ipsilateral lung V{sub 20Gy} reduced from 22 {+-} 4.4% for the FO-plan to 18 {+-} 3% for the gEUD-plan. All other dosimetric quantities shifted towards lower doses for the gEUD-plan. gEUD-based optimization can be used to search for plans of different DVHs with the same gEUDs. The use of gEUD allows selective optimization and reduction of the dose for each OAR and results in a truly individualized treatment plan.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a robust method for deriving dose-painting prescription functions using spatial information about the risk for disease recurrence. Methods: Spatial distributions of radiobiological model parameters are derived from distributions of recurrence risk after uniform irradiation. These model parameters are then used to derive optimal dose-painting prescription functions given a constant mean biologically effective dose. Results: An estimate for the optimal dose distribution can be derived based on spatial information about recurrence risk. Dose painting based on imaging markers that are moderately or poorly correlated with recurrence risk are predicted to potentially result in inferior disease control when comparedmore » the same mean biologically effective dose delivered uniformly. A robust optimization approach may partially mitigate this issue. Conclusions: The methods described here can be used to derive an estimate for a robust, patient-specific prescription function for use in dose painting. Two approximate scaling relationships were observed: First, the optimal choice for the maximum dose differential when using either a linear or two-compartment prescription function is proportional to R, where R is the Pearson correlation coefficient between a given imaging marker and recurrence risk after uniform irradiation. Second, the predicted maximum possible gain in tumor control probability for any robust optimization technique is nearly proportional to the square of R.« less
  • Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application formore » tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.« less